Photos from the Lexington Herald-Leader archives updated daily

Anti-rock music revival, 1986

Michael Watson, an evangelist from Buhl, Ala., held up a Black Sabbath album January 10, 1986 during a revival at the Winchester Church of God Cathedral entitled "Rock of the 80's - A Christian Perspective on Rock Music." The revival also featured the burning of rock records and tapes.  Photo by David Perry | Staff

Michael Watson, an evangelist from Buhl, Ala., held up a Black Sabbath album on Jan. 10, 1986, during a revival billed as “Rock of the ’80s — A Christian Perspective on Rock Music” at the Winchester Church of God Cathedral. The revival featured the burning of rock records and tapes. Photo by David Perry | Staff

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Downtown Wheelwright, 1979

Downtown Wheelwright, located in Floyd County, Aug. 7, 1979. At the time of this photo, a little over 800 people lived in the Eastern Kentucky town. Today it is about the same. The town was founded by the Elk Horn Coal Company in 1916 and was named for the company's president at that time, Jere H. Wheelwright. The building with the Wheelwright Clinic sign has since been torn down. Photo by Byran Lutz

Downtown Wheelwright in Floyd County, Aug. 7, 1979. At the time of this photo, slightly more than 800 people lived in the Eastern Kentucky town. Today it is about the same. The town was founded by the Elk Horn Coal Co. in 1916 and was named for the company’s president at that time, Jere H. Wheelwright. The building with the Wheelwright Clinic sign has since been torn down. Photo by Byran Lutz

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‘Abby Airbag’ teaches car safety, 1997

Jerry Lovett introduces mascot “Abby Airbag” during airbag an safety awareness press conference Feb. 11, 1997 in Frankfort. Kentucky State Police – along with the Chrysler Corp., the American Automobile Association and the American Academy of Pediatrics – unveiled a public education campaign that children should sit buckled up in the back seat when they ride in vehicles equipped with air bags. Abby Airbag,” a safety mascot dressed in a Kentucky blue and white cheerleader skirt and saddle shoes, will help spread the message at schools and day care centers. Tina Cox, program manager with the Kentucky State Police Highway Safety Standards Branch, came up with the idea for “Abby Airbag” while taking a shower one morning before work. Cox’s husband Rusty, who is a firefighter, put his wife’s thoughts on paper and the sketch was sent to a West Virginia company that makes mascots for colleges and universities. One month and $1,600 later and Kentucky has its own spokesperson to spread the word about air bag safety. Photo by Mary Annette Pember | staff file photo

Jerry Lovett, director of operations with the Kentucky State Police, introduced “Abby Airbag” during an airbag safety awareness news conference on Feb. 11, 1997, in Frankfort. Kentucky State Police – along with the Chrysler Corp., the American Automobile Association and the American Academy of Pediatrics – launched the public-education campaign that children should sit buckled up in the back seat when they ride in vehicles equipped with air bags. Abby Airbag, dressed in a Kentucky blue and white cheerleader skirt and saddle shoes, helped spread the message at schools and day care centers. Tina Cox, program manager with the Kentucky State Police Highway Safety Standards Branch, came up with the idea for “Abby Airbag” one morning before work. Cox’s husband, Rusty, a firefighter, put his wife’s thoughts on paper, and the sketch was sent to a West Virginia company that makes mascots for colleges and universities. One month and $1,600 later, Kentucky had its spokesperson to spread the word about air bag safety. Photo by Mary Annette Pember | Staff

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Legends ballpark construction, 2000

Home plate is staked-out as construction continues on the Lexington Legends minor league baseball field and stadium next to Northland Shopping Center Nov. 29, 2000. At the time of this picture, the Legends were less than five months from opening day. The stadium was named Applebee's Park for the team's first nine seasons. Since 2011 it has been called Whitaker Bank Ballpark. Thursday, April 16 is opening day for the Legends 2015 season. Photo by David Perry | staff

Home plate was staked out on Nov. 29, 2000, as construction continued on the Lexington Legends’ minor league baseball field and stadium next to Northland Shopping Center. At the time of this picture, the Legends were less than five months from opening day. The stadium was named Applebee’s Park for the team’s first nine seasons. Since 2011, it has been called Whitaker Bank Ballpark. This Thursday is opening day for the Legends’ 2015 season. Photo by David Perry | Staff

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Ades-Lexington Dry Goods building

Undated photo of the Ades-Lexington Dry Goods Company building, 249 East Main Street. In 1977, the Ades family discontinued the dry goods business and the building became a warehouse. The site is now home to Portofino restaurant on the first floor and businesses such as Thomas & King Inc. Herald-Leader archive photo

An undated photo of the Ades-Lexington Dry Goods Co. building, 249 East Main Street. In 1977, the Ades family discontinued the dry goods business, and the building became a warehouse. The site is now home to Portofino restaurant on the first floor and other businesses, including Thomas & King Inc. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

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Henry Clay High School, 1948

Henry Clay High School, August, 1948. Lexington's oldest public high school opened on Main Street in 1928. In 1970 the school moved to it's current location on Fontaine Road. The Main Street location now houses the main offices of the Fayette County Public Schools system. Herald-Leader archive photo.

The former Henry Clay High School in August 1948. Lexington’s oldest public high school opened on Main Street in 1928. In 1970, the school moved to its current location on Fontaine Road. The former high school now houses the main offices of the Fayette County Public Schools system. Herald-Leader Archive Photo.

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The Who in concert, 1980

At 6:20 p.m. July 11, 1980, the Rupp Arena gates opened for fans to attend the Who rock concert. It was the British rock groups first show in the area since a December 1979 performance in Cincinnati in which 11 young people died while trying to get into Riverfront Coliseum. A first-come, first-seated policy or festival seating was blamed in part for the deaths. Rupp Arena sells concerts on a reserved-seating basis but officials wanted to make sure safety was a priority. Ten Lexington fire officials, at least four undercover police narcotics officer and an estimated 150 off-duty police and private security officers watched for trouble from the 21,000 fans in attendance. No injureis were reported but 40 were arrested on a variety of drug charges. Tickets for the show cost $8-12. Photo by Christy Porter | staff

At 6:20 p.m. July 11, 1980, the Rupp Arena gates opened for a concert by The Who. It was the British rock group’s first show in the area since a December 1979 performance in Cincinnati, where 11 young people died while trying to get into Riverfront Coliseum. A first-come, first-seated policy, or festival seating, was blamed as a factor in the deaths. Rupp Arena sells concerts on a reserved-seating basis, but officials wanted to make sure safety was a priority. Ten Lexington fire officials, at least four undercover police narcotics officers and an estimated 150 off-duty police and private security officers watched for trouble from the 21,000 fans in attendance. No injuries were reported, but 40 people were arrested on a variety of drug charges. Tickets for the show cost $8 to $12.  Photo by Christy Porter | Staff

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Rupp Arena construction, 1974

Aerial picture of downtown Lexington, Nov. 23, 1974. Main Street runs from the top to the bottom up the middle of the picture. Rupp Arena is shown under construction in the lower right corner.

Aerial photo of downtown Lexington on Nov. 23, 1974. Main Street runs vertically in the middle of the photo. Rupp Arena is shown under construction near the lower right corner.

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Computer shopping, 1994

Jim and Rachel Daniels of Frankfort, got some help in shopping for a new computer system from Best Buy salesperson Noah Cyboron Oct. 4, 1994. Note the price for the machine they were looking at: $1,296. Photo by Drew Fritz

Jim and Rachel Daniels of Frankfort got some help from Best Buy staffer Noah Cyboron while shopping for a new computer on Oct. 4, 1994. Note the price for the machine they were looking at: $1,296, plus $228 for the monitor. Photo by Drew Fritz

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Lexington police officers, 1951

From left, Lexington policemen Lloyd Lindsay, Claude Ginter, William Foster and Bryan Henry chat. Published in the Herald-Leader January 14, 1951. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

From left, Lexington police officers Lloyd Lindsay, Claude Ginter, William Foster and Bryan Henry. Published in the Herald-Leader on Jan. 14, 1951. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

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