Photos from the Lexington Herald-Leader archives updated daily

Silvestri’s market set to close, 1961

Three generations of Silvestris prepared to close the fruit store that the family had operated for many years at the entrance to the Lafayette-Phoenix parking garage on East Main Street. Joe, left, his son, David, and his father, Harry, closed the market after business hours the day after this photo was taken, Aug. 10, 1961. The store was formerly known as Marcellino’s and was first opened in 1896 by Italian-born Anthony Marcellino. After Anthony’s death in 1940, his son-in-law, Harry Silvestri, took over operation of the store. Shelves were stocked with foods packed in countries from Israel to Japan. Silvestri’s carried a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, plus exotic foods, such as chocolate-covered ants and grasshoppers, and rattlesnake meat. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

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Turner brothers with 29-pound catfish, 1946

Brothers Pat Turner, left, of Boyle County and Hugh Turner of Lexington displayed a 29-pound “yellow cat” caught on a trot line near the Chenault bridge on Herrington Lake in July 1946. Along with another brother, Bill Turner, the three caught about 35 fish. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

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Kentucky-Florida game at Rupp Arena, 1992

Kentucky’s Jamal Mashburn and Florida’s Stacey Poole went after a rebound on Jan. 11, 1992, during the Cats’ 81-60 win over the Gators at Rupp Arena. Poole finished with 21 points. Mashburn had 18, 14 of which came in the second half, helping the 15th-ranked Cats pull away after a one-point lead at halftime. UK went on to finish the year winning the SEC East regular season title and the SEC Tournament. They lost in the NCAA East Regional Finals to Duke. Photo by Janet Worne | Staff

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Mitch McConnell, 1978

Then-Jefferson County Judge-Executive Mitch McConnell, at the Kentucky Federation of Republican Women’s meeting on Jan. 11, 1978, at Lexington’s Hilton Inn. McConnell, then 35, had defeated Democrat Todd Hollenbach two months earlier, becoming the highest-ranking Republican officeholder in the state. He told board members of the group that the way for Republicans to get elected in Kentucky was to start early, work hard and not emphasize party labels. A trend away from voting along party lines is good for the minority Republicans, he said, because “if they vote the party line, we lose.” … “The way to win … while maintaining the party base, is to have a good strong candidate who isn’t too strongly identified with the party.” McConnell offered to help other Republicans who wanted to run for office in the state. “A one-party state is not healthy,” he said. “We are not strong enough in Frankfort right now to be taken seriously, and that’s bad for the people.” Click here to see other photos from our archives of McConnell, now the U.S. Senate majority leader, who was recently back in Kentucky for several meetings with constituents. Photo by Frank Anderson | Staff

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Artist Joe Petro presents President Eisenhower with Man o’ War drawing, 1954

President Dwight D. Eisenhower, left, received a pencil drawing of Man o’ War from Transylvania student Joe Petro on April 23, 1954. Transylvania President Frank Rose was at right. Petro, a Lexington native, graduated from Henry Clay High School before studying art at Transylvania. He became an accomplished artist and returned to Transy in 1977 to become artist-in-residence. Eisenhower was in Lexington to speak during the convocation marking the 175th anniversary of the founding of the school. An estimated 6,500 to 7,000 people attended. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

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All-city elementary school band members, 1948

From left, three members of the all-city elementary school band, Orcena Lyle, Connie Lyle and Betty Jean Gourley, rehearsed for the city school music festival with director Joseph Friedman in April 1948. The concert was held April 30 at the Henry Clay High School auditorium. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

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Kentucky Derby winner Charismatic, 1999

Jockey Chris Antley and Charismatic received the traditional blanket of roses after winning the Kentucky Derby on May 1, 1999, at Churchill Downs in Louisville. Charismatic, who fell short in his Triple Crown bid, finishing third in the Belmont Stakes, died Sunday at Georgetown’s Old Friends Equine farm.  He was  21. Photo by David Coyle

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Festival Market’s carousel, 1994

The carousel in Festival Market, now called Triangle Square, July 25, 1994, three days after it and the building was sold at auction. The 22-foot-wide, 12-horse carousel was bought by politician and Lexington caterer Jerry Lundergan for $35,000. He tried to sell it to the Lexington Children's Museum for the same price he paid for it. Mayor Pam Miller said the city had considered buying the carousel for the museum but they didn't have the money to buy it or someone to run it and "there is no extra space in the Children's Museum," she said. Lundergan eventually sold the carousel to Tom's Farms, a produce and amusement complex in Corona, Calif. It is still in use there today. "It's a beautiful piece of equipment," Lundergan said after the auction for the carousel, which was built in San Francisco in 1986. "It was the showpiece of Festival Market." The carousel was always popular and added to the vibrancy of the mall, said Dudley Webb, partner with the Webb Cos. which developed the downtown Lexington shopping center. The $16 million, three-story mall opened in 1986 as Lexington Festival Market, designed as an upscale center with dozens of shops and restaurants. While children rode the merry-go-round on the top floor, a jazz pianist played lunchtimes in the courtyard below. However, the mall, which was expected to have up to 70 businesses, never found its niche and has lost money each year since it opened. At the time of the auction, the it was in the midst of converting from an upscale center to a factory outlet mall. Developed by the Webb Companies in partnership with Kentucky Central Life Insurance Co., the mall became a casualty of the failure of Kentucky Central. When the insurance company failed in 1993, the mall was placed in receivership. The estimated debt of the mall was more than $13 million, according to court records. The Webbs had managed the mall since it opened but gave up, citing frustration over efforts to revitalize it. A judge's order dissolved the pa

The carousel in Festival Market, now called Triangle Center, on July 25, 1994, three days after the carousel and the building were sold at auction. The 12-horse carousel, 22 feet in diameter, was bought by politician and Lexington caterer Jerry Lundergan for $35,000. He tried to sell it to the Lexington Children’s Museum for the same price he paid for it. Mayor Pam Miller said the city had considered buying the carousel for the museum, but there wasn’t the money to buy it or someone to run it, and “there is no extra space in the Children’s Museum,” she said. Lundergan eventually sold the carousel to Tom’s Farms, a produce and amusement complex in Corona, Calif. It remains in use there today. The carousel, built in San Francisco in 1986, was “a beautiful piece of equipment,” Lundergan said after the auction. “It was the showpiece of Festival Market.” The carousel was always popular and added to the vibrancy of the mall, said Dudley Webb, partner with the Webb Cos., which developed the downtown Lexington shopping center. The $16 million, three-story mall opened in 1986 as Lexington Festival Market, designed as an upscale center with dozens of shops and restaurants. While children rode the merry-go-round on the top floor, a jazz pianist played lunchtimes in the courtyard below. However, the mall, which was expected to have as many as 70 businesses, never found its niche, and it lost money each year since it opened. At the time of the auction, it was being converted from an upscale center to a factory outlet mall. It was developed by the Webb Cos. in partnership with Kentucky Central Life Insurance Co., but when the insurance company failed in 1993, the mall was placed in receivership. The estimated debt of the mall was more than $13 million, according to court records. The Webbs had managed the mall since it opened but gave up, citing frustration over efforts to revitalize it. A judge’s order dissolved the partnership between The Webb Cos. and Kentucky Central, and the building went to auction, where it sold for $600,000. Photo by Frank Anderson | Staff

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Nazareth School of Nursing student nurses, 1946

Five of the 39 student nurses in the new fall class at the Nazareth School of Nursing at Saint Joseph Hospital and two members of the school staff in September 1946. From left, Sister Joseph Beatrice, staff member and editor of the school paper; Charlotte Wood of Beckley, W. Va.; Alice Keller of Covington; Louise Amato of Lexington; Jean Tabor of Morehead; and Virginia Duffy of Midway, being fitted for a uniform by Sister Robert Ann, director of the school. A total of 115 students were enrolled in the school, which was operated by the Sisters of Charity of Nazareth in conjunction with St. Joseph’s Hospital. The school, which opened in 1919, was housed in Euphrasia hall and was rated by national and state accrediting agencies as one of the outstanding schools of nursing in the South. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

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Kentucky beats Georgia in Rupp Arena, 1994

Kentucky’s Gimel Martinez, left, and Roderick Rhodes trapped Georgia’s Charles Claxton in the first half of their game on Feb. 27, 1994, in Rupp Arena. Rhodes had 15 points, six rebounds and three steals in the Wildcats’ 80-59 win. The Rick Pitino-coached team went on to with the SEC tournament, then lost in the second round of the NCAA Tournament to Marquette, finishing the season 27-7. The Wildcats play the Bulldogs on Saturday night in Athens. Photo by Marvin Hill Jr. | Staff

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