Photos from the Lexington Herald-Leader archives updated daily

St. Joseph Hospital, 1947

St. Joseph's Hospital at 544 West Second Street in Lexington, Nov. 1947. St. Joseph, Lexington's first hospital opened in 1877 and was initially located on Lincoln Walk, near Maxwell Street. In 1878 it relocated to this Second Street location, going through several additions and renovations in the 81 years to follow. In 1959 they moved to their current location on Harrodsburg Road. The four-story building pictured, which had a 300-bed capacity, was razed in 1966. It is now the site of Connie Griffith Manor, a 10-story senior housing apartment managed by the Lexington Housing Authority. Published in the Lexington Herald-Leader November 16, 1947. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

St. Joseph Hospital at 544 West Second Street in Lexington, November 1947. St. Joseph, Lexington’s first hospital, opened in 1877 on Lincoln Walk, near Maxwell Street. In 1878, it moved to this Second Street address, going through several additions and renovations in the 81 years to follow. In 1959, the hospital moved to its current site on Harrodsburg Road. The four-story building above, which had a 300-bed capacity, was razed in 1966. It is now the site of Connie Griffith Manor, a 10-story senior housing apartment managed by the Lexington Housing Authority. This photo was published in the Lexington Herald-Leader on Nov. 16, 1947 with a story about the hospital celebrating its 70th anniversary in Lexington. Click here to see a PDF of that page of the newspaper. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

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Balancing act, 1988

Lexingtonian Mark Summers balanced his antique chair purchase atop his head and as he pedalled home along South Limestone Street near the UK campus on February 11, 1988. "I purchased the chair at a downtown antique dealer, " Summers said,  "and this was the onlky way I had to get it home." He said the distance between the antique dealer and his home was roughly two miles. Photo by Michael Malone | Staff

Lexingtonian Mark Summers balanced an antique chair atop his head as he pedaled home along South Limestone near the University of Kentucky on Feb. 11, 1988. “I purchased the chair at a downtown antique dealer, ” Summers said, “and this was the only way I had to get it home.” Summers, a UK history professor, said the distance between the antique dealer and his home was roughly two miles. Photo by Michael Malone | Staff

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Muhammad Ali on the UK bench, 1995

Three-time heavyweight boxing champion Muhammad Ali sat on the Kentucky bench during the Cats' game against Florida, Feb. 18, 1995 at Rupp Arena. Ali attended the game as part of a one-day promotional visit to Lexington for a play, Ali, which ran later that month at the Opera House. A playful Ali met the UK players in the locker room before the game. "He said I'll take you all on," Jeff Sheppard said. Ali also threw some punches. "I jabbed at Anthony Epps," Rodrick Rhodes said. "He told Epps he reminded him of Joe Frazier." UK coach Rick Pitino noted that the UK players were too young to remember Ali in his fighting prime. "For me, personally, it was a thrill of a lifetime," the UK coach said of Ali's presence on the bench. Ali and Sheppard shared a laugh while the game neared its dramatic finish. With 1:23 left and the Cats ahead 77-75, Sheppard was fouled but had to leave the game because of blood on his nose. Chris Harrison entered the game and made both free throws. As Harrison shot and team physician Dr. David Caborn worked on a cut on Sheppard's nose, Sheppard turned to Ali and said something. Ali and Sheppard then smiled. "I told him I got punched in the nose," Sheppard said. Photo by Mark Cornelison | staff

Three-time heavyweight boxing champion Muhammad Ali sat on the Kentucky bench during the Cats’ 87-77 win over Florida on Feb. 18, 1995, at Rupp Arena. Ali attended the game as part of a one-day promotional visit to Lexington for a play, Ali, that ran later that month at the Opera House. A playful Ali met the UK players in the locker room before the game. “He said, ‘I’ll take you all on,'” Jeff Sheppard said. Ali also threw some punches. “I jabbed at Anthony Epps,” Rodrick Rhodes said. “He told Epps he reminded him of Joe Frazier.” UK coach Rick Pitino said the UK players were too young to remember Ali in his fighting prime. “For me, personally, it was a thrill of a lifetime,” the UK coach said of Ali’s presence on the bench. With 1:23 left and the Cats ahead by two, 77-75, Sheppard was fouled but had to leave the game because of blood on his nose. Chris Harrison entered the game and made both free throws. As Harrison shot and team physician David Caborn worked on a cut on Sheppard’s nose, Sheppard turned to Ali and said something. Ali and Sheppard then smiled. “I told him I got punched in the nose,” Sheppard said. Here is another photo from his visit that day to Lexington. Photo by Mark Cornelison | Staff

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Golden Gloves winner, 1948

Aloft went the snappy right hand of Jimmy Barrett, lifted by referee Charley McCarthy on February 3, 1948, after the Lexington boy punched out a decision in four rounds over Archie Ware of Shelbyville to win the state open featherweight title and become the first Open champion crowned in The Herald-Leader Golden Gloves tournament at Woodland auditorium.  The featherweight king won a chance to compete in the national Golden Gloves tourney through his victories here. Published in the Lexington Leader February 4, 1948.

Aloft went the snappy right hand of Jimmy Barrett, lifted by referee Charley McCarthy on Feb. 3, 1948, after the Lexington teen won a four-round decision over Archie Ware of Shelbyville to win the state open featherweight title and become the first Open champion crowned in The Herald-Leader Golden Gloves tournament at Woodland auditorium. The featherweight king won a chance to compete in the national Golden Gloves tourney. Published in the Lexington Leader on Feb. 4, 1948. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

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Police band, 1993

In 1993, Lexington police officer Debbie Wagner, fourth from the left, organized the DARE 911 Band, which used rock music to spread an anti-drug message to area schools. The group, photographed on Feb. 9, 1993, were made up of members of The Lexington Police, Fayette Co. Sheriff's Dept., University of Kentucky Police, and the Horse Park Police. Wagner, a 38-year veteran of the force known for community outreach, retired from the Lexington police force in January, 2016. Photo by Charles Bertram | staff

In 1993, Lexington police officer Debbie Wagner, fourth from left, organized the DARE 911 Band, which used rock music to spread an anti-drug message to area schools. The group, photographed on Feb. 9, 1993, were made up of officers with Lexington and University of Kentucky police, the Fayette County Sheriff’s Department and Kentucky Horse Park Police. Wagner, an officer known for community outreach, retired from the Lexington police force this month after a 38-year career. Photo by Charles Bertram | staff

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Downtown Middlesboro, 1983

Downtown Middlesboro, looking west down Cumberland Avenue at the intersection of 19th Street, Jan. 18, 1983. The town is located in Bell County, near the Cumberland Gap in the southeastern part of Kentucky, near where Tennesse, Kentucky and Virginia meet. Photo by Charles Bertram | staff

Downtown Middlesboro, looking west down Cumberland Avenue at 19th Street, on Jan. 18, 1983. The town is in Bell County, near Cumberland Gap in the southeastern part of Kentucky, near where Tennessee, Kentucky and Virginia meet. Photo by Charles Bertram | Staff

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Kentucky over Tennessee, 1978

Kentucky's Rick Robey put up a shot against the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, February 25, 1978. UK cinched an NCAA berth with a 68-57 victory. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

Kentucky’s Rick Robey put up a shot against Tennessee on Feb. 25, 1978. UK clinched an NCAA berth with a 68-57 victory. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

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Construction along Nicholasville Road, 1985

Storm and sanitary sewer construction along Nicholasville Road, shown at left, May 8, 1985. The area show is just south of Fayette Mall, around what is now the Courtesy Acura dealership and Bella Notte restaurant. In the background, West Tiverton Way can bee seen running horizontally across the picture. Visible it is Brecher's Lighting store, which is there today and a Lowe's home improvement store. This location closed when a newer, bigger Lowe's was built just up the road in a shopping center near the Man o'War intersection in the spring of 1998. Click on the image for a larger view. Photo by David Perry | staff

Storm and sanitary sewer construction along Nicholasville Road, shown at left, on May 8, 1985. The area shown is just south of Fayette Mall, near where what is now the Courtesy Acura dealership and Bella Notte restaurant. In the background, West Tiverton Way can bee seen running horizontally. Visible is Brecher’s Lighting store, which is there today, and a Lowe’s home improvement store. That Lowe’s store closed when a newer, bigger one was built just up the road in a shopping center near the Man o’ War intersection in spring 1998. Click on the image for a larger view. Photo by David Perry | Staff

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Sunday comics, January 1966

We thought you might find it interesting to see one of the Sunday Herald-Leader comics pages from 50 years ago, January 30, 1966. At that time the Herald-Leader ran eight pages of comics on Sundays. This page carried three popular strips, which included Moon Mullins, Gasoline Alley and Smilin Jack. Strips on the other pages included Dick Tracy, Peanuts, Dagwood, Steve Canyon, Freddy, Bringing Up Father, Henry, Kerry Drake, Mary Perkins, Nancy, Rex Morgan, M.D., Li'l Abner, Mary Worth, Beetle Bailey, The Little Woman, Donald Duck, Dennnis the Menace, and Priscilla's Pop.

We thought you might find it interesting to see one of the Sunday Herald-Leader comics pages from 50 years ago, Jan. 30, 1966. At that time, the Herald-Leader ran eight pages of comics on Sundays. This page carried three popular strips: Moon Mullins, Gasoline Alley and Smilin’ Jack. Strips on the other pages included Dick Tracy, Peanuts, Dagwood, Steve Canyon, Freddy, Bringing up Father, Henry, Kerry Drake, Mary Perkins, Nancy, Rex Morgan, M.D., Li’l Abner, Mary Worth, Beetle Bailey, The Little Woman, Donald Duck, Dennis the Menace, and Priscilla’s Pop.

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Before the Kentucky-Kansas game, 1950

Two of the nation's top basketball programs, head coaches and big men posed for a picture the day before the University of Kentucky played Kansas in Memorial Coliseum in December 1950. From left, are Clyde Lovellette, 6-9 Kansas University center, Kansas  Coach Phog Allen, Kentucky Coach Adolph Rupp and Bill Spivey, 7-foot Kentucky  center. The quartet got together December 15, 1950 at Memorial Coliseum where both the Jayhawks and Wildcats worked out prior to their game December 16, 1950. UK dominated KU and won 68-39. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

Two of the nation’s top college basketball programs, head coaches and big men posed for a picture the day before Kentucky played Kansas in Memorial Coliseum in December 1950. From left, Clyde Lovellette, Kansas’ 6-9 center, Kansas Coach Phog Allen, Kentucky Coach Adolph Rupp and Bill Spivey, Kentucky’s 7-foot center. The quartet got together Dec. 15, 1950, at Memorial Coliseum, where both teams worked out before their game the next day. Kentucky dominated Kansas and won 68-39. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

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