Photos from the Lexington Herald-Leader archives updated daily

Ashley Judd, 1988

20-year-old Ashley Judd speaking at a April 14, 1988 protest march at the state capitol in Frankfort demanding the resignation of University of Kentucky trustee A.B. "Happy" Chandler." In the week prior, the 89-year-old Chandler used of a racial slur at the board's investment committee meeting. About 200 people marched on the state Capitol demanding Chandler's removal from the board. Gov. Wallace Wilkinson met the hostile crowd on the steps and urged forgiveness for Chandler, who had endorsed him in his 1987 gubernatorial campaign. Protesters booed Wilkinson when he said he would not remove Chandler from the UK board. Judd, the daughter of Naomi Judd and the sister of Wynona Judd, the award-winning country music duo from Ashland, told the crowd "I know Governor Wilkinson, and I think he was a little surprised because I was a white, middle-class person in this predominantly black crowd." Judd, then a UK sophomore majoring in history and French, rounded up students to join the march. She walked through the halls of classroom buildings pleading with students to leave their classes and join the rally. Shouting "Stop racism everywhere" and "Let's walk out and let's go to Frankfort," Judd and a few other members of the United Student Association for Racial Justice attracted about 50 UK students to make the trip to Frankfort. When Chandler celebrated his 90th birthday later in the year, he told a reporter he had no regrets about anything during his long and colorful public career. "I wouldn't change a jot or tittle," said Chandler, who died in 1991. Photo by Stephen Castleberry | Staff

20-year-old Ashley Judd spoke at a protest march on April 14, 1988, at the state capitol in Frankfort, demanding the resignation of University of Kentucky trustee A.B. “Happy” Chandler. The previous week, Chandler, then 89, used a racial slur at the board’s investment committee meeting. About 200 people marched on the state Capitol demanding Chandler’s removal from the board. Gov. Wallace Wilkinson met the hostile crowd on the steps and urged forgiveness for Chandler, who had endorsed him in his 1987 gubernatorial campaign. Protesters booed Wilkinson when he said he wouldn’t remove Chandler from the UK board. Judd, the daughter of Naomi Judd and the sister of Wynona Judd, the award-winning country music duo from Ashland, told the crowd, “I know Gov. Wilkinson, and I think he was a little surprised because I was a white, middle-class person in this predominantly black crowd.” Judd, then a UK sophomore majoring in history and French, rounded up students to join the march. She walked through the halls of classroom buildings pleading with students to leave their classes and join the rally. Shouting “Stop racism everywhere” and “Let’s walk out and let’s go to Frankfort,” Judd and a few other members of the United Student Association for Racial Justice attracted about 50 UK students to make the trip to Frankfort. When Chandler celebrated his 90th birthday later in the year, he told a reporter he had no regrets about anything during his long and colorful public career. “I wouldn’t change a jot or tittle,” said Chandler, who died in 1991. Photo by Stephen Castleberry | Staff

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Purcell’s department store, 1967

Purcell's department store in downtown Lexington at 320 W. Main St., Nov. 5, 1967. Purcell's, which opened in 1887 as a 5 &10 called the Racket Store, originally was located on the north side of West Main Street. In 1923, its founder, Jefferson Davis Purcell, bought property on the south side and opened a department store at 320 W. Main St. It was later enlarged. In its heyday, during the 1940s and '50s, Purcell's was not only one of Lexington's busiest, but one of its most colorful department stores. Customers often bypassed the crowded elevator so they would not miss anything on display in the store's 22 departments. It was one of the first in the city to have a live Santa Claus and strolling carolers at Christmas. At one time, the store carried 75,000 charge accounts, said Stanhope Wiedemann, president and CEO of the department store his grandfather founded. Among the many promotions it sponsored were embroidery and meat-carving schools and a table-setting contest. In 1951, at the request of a Lexington man, employees boxed the man up in a crate and delivered him, engagement ring in hand, to his girlfriend's home. She accepted. In 1970, after several stores left downtown, Purcell's closed. The building was razed in 1980 to make way for the $50 million Vine Plaza, which includes the Radisson Hotel and parking garage. Herald-Leader staff photo

Purcell’s department store at 320 West Main Street in downtown Lexington on Nov. 5, 1967. Purcell’s, which opened in 1887 as a 5-and-10 called the Racket Store, originally was on the north side of West Main Street. In 1923, its founder, Jefferson Davis Purcell, bought property on the south side and opened the department store at 320 West Main. The store was was later enlarged. In its heyday, during the 1940s and ’50s, Purcell’s was not only one of Lexington’s busiest, but one of its most colorful department stores. Customers often bypassed the crowded elevator so they wouldn’t miss anything on display in the store’s 22 departments. It was one of the first in the city to have a live Santa Claus and strolling carolers at Christmas. At one time, the store carried 75,000 charge accounts, said Stanhope Wiedemann, president and CEO of the department store, and a grandson of the store’s founder. Among the many promotions it sponsored were embroidery and meat-carving schools, and a table-setting contest. In 1951, at the request of a Lexington man, employees boxed the man in a crate and delivered him, engagement ring in hand, to his girlfriend’s home. She accepted his proposal. In 1970, after several stores left downtown, Purcell’s closed. The building was razed in 1980 to make way for the $50 million Vine Plaza, which includes the Radisson Hotel and parking garage. Herald-Leader Staff Photo

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11th Region basketball tournament, 1959

Lafayette's Jeff Mullins is surrounded by Dunbar's James Young and Felix Scruggs during the 11th regional high school basketball tournament in March, 1959. Dunbar won the game, 54-48. Published in the Herald-Leader March 14, 1959. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

Lafayette’s Jeff Mullins was surrounded by Dunbar’s James Young and Felix Scruggs during the 11th Region high school basketball tournament in March 1959. Dunbar won the game, 54-48. Published in the Herald-Leader on March 14, 1959. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

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Nolan Richardson, 1996

Arkansas coach Nolan Richardson reacts to an officals call Feb. 11, 1996 durning the second half of Kentucky's 88-73 win over the Razorbacks. The second-ranked Wildcats utilized a deep bench and improved to 20-1 overall and 10-0 in the Southeastern Conference. Richardson, who's Arkansas team won the NCAA title two years ealier, was known for coaching teams that played an fast-paced game with pressure defense - a style that was known as "40 Minutes of Hell." Photo by Frank Anderson | staff

Arkansas coach Nolan Richardson reacted to an official’s call during Kentucky’s 88-73 win over the Razorbacks on Feb. 11, 1996, in Rupp Arena. The second-ranked Wildcats improved to 20-1 overall and 10-0 in the Southeastern Conference. Richardson, whose Arkansas team won the NCAA title two years earlier, was known for coaching teams that played a fast-paced game with pressure defense — a style that was known as “40 minutes of hell.”  Photo by Frank Anderson | Staff

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Leonard Nimoy at EKU, 1978

Actor Lenoard Nimoy spoke at Eastern Kentucky University on Feb. 16, 1978. Nimoy was known for his role as Mr. Spock in the "Star Trek" TV series and movies. When he spoke at EKU in Richmond, filming for the science-fiction series had been completed 10 years ealier. But Nimoy told the crowd, "it's had an amazing afterlife." As proof, a boy about 4 or 5 years old slipped down the aisle to the Hiram Brock Auditorium stage and called for Nimoy to hold him. Nimoy picked him up, carried him to the microphone and said, "See, there is magic in the character. There are lots of reasons to respond to Spock. ... we all sense his dignity." Photo by David Perry | staff

Actor Leonard Nimoy spoke at Eastern Kentucky University on Feb. 16, 1978. Nimoy was known for his role as Mr. Spock in the Star Trek TV series and movies. When he spoke at EKU in Richmond, filming for the science-fiction series had been completed 10 years ealier. But Nimoy told the crowd, “it’s had an amazing afterlife.” As proof, a boy about 4 or 5 years old slipped down the aisle to the Hiram Brock Auditorium stage and called for Nimoy to hold him. Nimoy picked him up, carried him to the microphone and said, “See, there is magic in the character. There are lots of reasons to respond to Spock. … we all sense his dignity.” Nimoy died Feb. 27, 2015. Photo by David Perry | staff

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Central Bank ATM, 1985

Central Bank ATM machine, Jan. 22, 1985 in Lexington. Photo by John C. Wyatt

An ATM at Central Bank in Lexington on Jan. 22, 1985.  Photo by John C. Wyatt | Staff

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Eastern Kentucky shopping center, 1984

Weddington Plaza Shopping Center April 18, 1984 on U.S. 23 in Coal Run Village, Ky., just outside of Pikeville. The shopping center is now occupied by a J.C. Penny department store, Save-A-Lot supermarket and other stores. Photo by Charles Bertram | staff

Weddington Plaza Shopping Center on U.S. 23 in Coal Run Village, just outside of Pikeville. The shopping center, shown on April 18, 1984, is now occupied by a JCPenney department store, a Save-A-Lot supermarket and other stores. Photo by Charles Bertram | Staff

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Downtown Georgetown, 1986

Aerial picture of downtown Georgetown, Kentucky, Aug. 6, 1986. The population around this time was just over 11,000. Today, it has eclipsed 30,000. Photo by Charles Bertram | staff.

Aerial view of downtown Georgetown on Aug. 6, 1986. The population at the time was slightly more than 11,000. Today, it has eclipsed 30,000. Photo by Charles Bertram | Staff

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Mannequin on the move, 1979

A driver goes down Limestone Street in Lexington with the bottom half of a mannequin wearing only underwear in the bed of his pick-up truck, February, 1979. Photo by Ron Garrison | staff

A pickup truck rolled on South Limestone in Lexington carrying the bottom half of a mannequin wearing only underwear in February 1979. Photo by Ron Garrison | Staff

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New Kids on the Block fans at Rupp Arena, 1990

From left, Laurie Beaven, 12, Amy Lanham, 12, and Melissa Gordon, 13, wait for the begining of the New Kids on the Block concert to begin Jan. 13, 1990 at Rupp Arena. The trio came from Spingfield and brought the homemade banner with them. With parents in tow, young girls wearing New Kids on the Block T-shirts, jackets, buttons, hats and bandanas flooded the Lexington Civic Center, waiting to get in to see the popular singing group. They paid at least $18.50 apiece for the opportunity. At the time of this nearly sold-out show of 21,000, the group had vaulted to teen stardom with three hits -- "This One's for the Children," "Cover Girl" and "Didn't I (Blow Your Mind)." The first two numbers of the New Kids' 90-minute concert -- "My Favorite Girl" and the beat-crazy "What'cha Gonna Do About It" -- were almost totally drowned out by the crowd, which shrieked and shrilled at every move the group made. Just how loud was the crowd? Well, let's put it this way. Earplugs were being sold at the concession stands. Photo by James D. VanHoose | staff

From left, Laurie Beaven, 12, Amy Lanham, 12, and Melissa Gordon, 13, waited for the begining of the New Kids on the Block concert on Jan. 13, 1990, at Rupp Arena. The trio came from Spingfield and brought the homemade banner with them. With parents in tow, young girls wearing New Kids on the Block T-shirts, jackets, buttons, hats and bandannas flooded the Lexington Civic Center to see the popular singing group. They paid at least $18.50 apiece for the opportunity. At the time of the nearly sold-out show of 21,000, the group had vaulted to teen stardom with three hits: This One’s for the Children, Cover Girl and Didn’t I (Blow Your Mind). The first two numbers of the New Kids’ 90-minute concert — My Favorite Girl and the beat-crazy What’cha Gonna Do About It — were almost totally drowned out by the crowd, which shrieked and shrilled at every move the group made. Just how loud was the crowd? Earplugs were being sold at the concession stands. Photo by James D. VanHoose | Staff

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