Photos from the Lexington Herald-Leader archives updated daily

Chubby Checker, 1981

Singer Chubby Checker performed on September  5, 1981 at the breeding season auction charity at the Hyatt Regency, downtown  Lexington, Ky. Checker was famous for the dance The Twist . The breeding season of 14  stallions were auctioned off. Funds from the benefit went to the Ephraim  McDowell Cancer Research Foundation for the construction of a cancer research  and treatment center. (The center would eventually be named the Markey Cancer  Center) Photo by Charles Bertram | Staff

Singer Chubby Checker performed on Sept. 5, 1981, at the breeding-season auction charity at the Hyatt Regency indowntown Lexington. Checker was famous for singing about and performing the dance The Twist. The breeding seasons of 14 stallions were auctioned off. Proceeds from the benefit went to the Ephraim McDowell Cancer Research Foundation for the construction of a cancer research and treatment center. (The center would eventually be named the Markey Cancer Center) Photo by Charles Bertram | Staff

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Fancy Farm Picnic, 1998

Congressman Scotty Baesler, holds a pair of shoes that belonged to retiring Sen. Wendell Ford that he says he intends to fill if he wins the seat that Ford then held.  Baesler, speaking at the Fancy Farm picnic in western Kentucky on Aug. 1, 1998 was running against fellow Congressman Jim Bunning. Baesler was narrowly defeated by Bunning in the general election. Photo by Frank Anderson | Staff

U.S. Rep. Scotty Baesler, D-Lexington, held a pair of shoes that belonged to retiring U.S. Sen. Wendell Ford that he said he intended to fill if he won Ford’s seat. Baesler, speaking at the Fancy Farm picnic in western Kentucky on Aug. 1, 1998, was running against fellow U.S. Rep. Jim Bunning, R-Fort Henry. Bunning narrowly defeated Baesler in the general election. Photo by Frank Anderson | Staff

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Fancy Farm Picnic, 1990

Lexington attorney Gatewood Galbraith talked with reporters before his speech at the 110th Fancy Farm Political Picnic at St. Jerome's Church in Fancy Farm, Ky., August 4, 1990. Photo by Charles Bertram | Staff

Lexington attorney Gatewood Galbraith talked with reporters before his speech at the 110th Fancy Farm political picnic on Aug. 4, 1990 at St. Jerome’s Church in Fancy Farm, Ky. Photo by Charles Bertram | Staff

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Fancy Farm Picnic, 1986

Randle Darnell and Marge Eastin, both of Benton, Ky., showed their support for several candidates as the waited for the speeches to begin at the 106th Fancy Farm Political Picnic at St. Jerome's Church in Fancy Farm, Ky., August 2, 1986. Photo by Charles Bertram | Staff

Randle Darnell and Marge Eastin, both of Benton, showed their support for Wendell Ford and other candidates as they waited for the speeches to begin at the 106th Fancy Farm political picnic on Aug. 2, 1986 at St. Jerome’s Church in Fancy Farm, Ky. Photo by Charles Bertram | Staff

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Neighborhood cleanup, 1971

City Commissioner Harry Sykes, center, joined  officials of Micro-City Government in a neighborhood cleanup on  East Third Street on July 14 1971. Others in photo are from left  Sandra Young, Vincent Caise, Sykes, Pat Tribble and James  Clayborne. At rear from left are James Johnson and Linda Parr.

City Commissioner Harry Sykes, center, joined officials of Micro-City Government in a neighborhood cleanup on East Third Street on July 14 1971. Front, from left: Sandra Young, Vincent Caise, Sykes, Pat Tribble and James Clayborne. At rear from left: James Johnson and Linda Parr. The young man at far right was not identified.

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Union Station, 1956

Lexington's Union Station was opened with great fanfare on August 4, 1907, with the arrival of the Chesapeake & Ohio Passenger Train #24.  A crowd estimated at three thousand was on hand to meet the train. The terminal fronted on Main Street, just west of Walnut St, now Martin Luther King Blvd. The exterior was built with red and yellow brick, with green and red glass.  The lobby was located in the center rotunda (fifty by eighty feet, with a central dome fifty feet high), with a Roman arch ceiling and six oak waiting benches. This photograph was published in the Lexington Herald July 25, 1956 when it was announced that the C&O Railway Company was moving out of Union Station. On May 9, 1957, the last passenger train (the Chesapeake & OhioÕs George Washington) departed from this facility.  The station was closed due to high operating overhead and low passenger travel. In March 1960, the building was demolished.

On May 9, 1956, the day this photo was published, it was announced that the Chesapeake & Ohio Railway Co. was moving out of Lexington’s Union Station. On May 9, 1957, the last passenger train (the George Washington) departed from the station. Union Station was closed because of high operating overhead and low passenger travel. It had opened with great fanfare on Aug. 4, 1907, with the arrival of C&O passenger train No. 24. A crowd estimated at 3,000 met the train. The terminal fronted Main Street, just west of Walnut Street, which has been renamed Martin Luther King Boulevard. The exterior was built with red and yellow brick, and green and red glass. The lobby was in the center rotunda, which was 50 by 80 feet, with a central dome 50 feet high. The lobby had a Roman arch ceiling and six oak waiting benches. In March 1960, the building was demolished.

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Streaker on UK campus, 1974

A  masked streaker evoked humor on March 5, 1974 from University of Kentucky students as he ran across the patio on central campus apparently  as a protest to the UK Board of Trustees, which was meeting at the Patterson Office Tower on March 5, 1974. The trustees were unaware of the incident. The high point of streaking's pop culture significance was in 1974, when thousands of streaks took place around the world.  Photo by E. Martin Jessee | Staff

A masked streaker evoked a reaction from University of Kentucky students  on March 5, 1974, as he ran across the patio on central campus in an apparent protest to the UK Board of Trustees, which was meeting at the Patterson Office Tower. The trustees were unaware of the incident. The high point of streaking’s pop culture significance was in 1974, when thousands of streaks took place around the world, including at that year’s Academy Awards. Photo by E. Martin Jessee | Staff

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Pat Boone and Shirley Jones during filming of ‘April Love,’ 1957

The movie April Love, was filmed in Lexington in 1957.  Stars Pat Boone, left and Shirley Jones, right, were photographed with Lexington's, Dorothy (Dedee) Leet and Carol Leet. Published in the Lexington Leader June 17, 1957.

The movie April Love was filmed in Lexington in 1957. Stars Pat Boone, left and Shirley Jones, right, were photographed withDorothy (Dedee) and Carol Leet of Lexington. Published in the Lexington Leader on June 17, 1957.

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Victorian Square building collapse, 1984

On the morning of June 18, 1984 construction workers noticed cracks appearing on the exterior of the old H.H. Leet Furniture Store during renovation for Victorian Square. Within minutes loud popping and cracking preceded a collapse of two-thirds of building at West Main St. and North Broadway.  Donald Webb, a principal in Victorian Square Associates and the Webb Companies was optimistic that the building would be re-built. Photo by Ron Garrison | Staff

On the morning of June 18, 1984, construction workers noticed cracks appearing on the exterior of the old H.H. Leet furniture store during renovation for Victorian Square. Within minutes, loud popping and cracking preceded a collapse of two-thirds of building at West Main Street and North Broadway. Donald Webb, a principal in Victorian Square Associates and the Webb Companies, was optimistic that the building would be rebuilt. Photo by Ron Garrison | Staff

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Downtown street scene, 1947

Southeast corner of Limestone and Main streets in 1947.  This corner is currently occupied by Phoenix Park. The photo was taken to run with a story about increased congestion that was expected as a result of an ordinance passed by the Board of City Commissioners that would allow the Lexington Railway System to erect a change-making and information booth there. Published in the Lexington  Leader, May 8 1947.

The southeast corner of Limestone and Main Street in 1947. This corner is now occupied by Phoenix Park. The photo was taken for a story about increased congestion that was expected as a result of an ordinance passed by city commissioners that would allow the Lexington Railway System to erect a change-making and information booth there. Published in the Lexington Leader on May 8 1947.

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