Photos from the Lexington Herald-Leader archives updated daily

Waiting for Tina Turner tickets, 1985

Rock and Roll fans made themselves comfortable outside the Lexington Center ticket office August 1, 1985, as they prepared to spend the night so they would be in line when Tina Turner's concert tickets went on sale the next morning. Turner's Private Dancer Tour played Rupp Arena September 6. Photo by Ron Garrison | Staff

Rock ‘n’ roll fans made themselves comfortable outside the Lexington Center ticket office on Aug. 1, 1985, as they prepared to spend the night to would be in line when Tina Turner’s concert tickets went on sale the next morning. Turner’s Private Dancer Tour played Rupp Arena on Sept. 6. Photo by Ron Garrison | Staff

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Rogers Restaurant, 1965

George Rogers in front of his restaurant at 601 West Main Street in June of 1965 after announcing plans to move the popular eatery to 808 South Broadway. Rogers bought the a former confectionery, located at the corner of Jefferson St. and West Main, in 1923. Rogers Restaurant featured home-style cooking and included hams he cured himself from hogs raised on his Woodford County farm. He sold the restaurant in 1974 to Charles Ellinger, who bought it as a Valentine's gift to his wife, Jan. Ellinger's son, Chuck Ellinger eventually took over the restaurant. Lexington's oldest restaurant closed it's doors on July 17, 2004. Published in the Lexington Herald June 19, 1965. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

George Rogers in front of his restaurant at 601 West Main Street in June 1965 after announcing plans to move the popular eatery to 808 South Broadway. Rogers had bought a former confectionery at Jefferson and West Main streets in 1923. Rogers Restaurant featured home-style cooking and included hams he cured himself from hogs raised on his farm in Woodford Count. He sold the restaurant in 1974 to Charles Ellinger, who bought it as a Valentine’s gift to his wife, Jan. The Ellingers’ son, Chuck, eventually took over the restaurant. Lexington’s oldest restaurant closed its doors on July 17, 2004. Published in the Lexington Herald June 19, 1965. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

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Lexington’s first peacetime female mail carrier, 1963

Ruby Flynn, 412 Price Road, was named substitute city letter carrier for the Lexington Post Office becoming the city's first peace time woman mail carrier in October 1963. Postmaster William Cecil said that all carriers begin as substitutes and generally serve on different routes before being assigned to a regular one. Mrs. Flynn, mother of six children, did civilian work with the Navy Department during World War II. Published in the Lexington Leader October 3, 1963.

Ruby Flynn was named a substitute city letter carrier for the Lexington Post Office in October 1963, becoming the city’s first peacetime female mail carrier. Postmaster William Cecil said all carriers begin as substitutes and generally serve on various routes before being assigned to a regular one. Flynn, the mother of six children, did civilian work with the Navy Department during World War II. Published in the Lexington Leader on Oct. 3, 1963.

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GE Lamp plant employees on strike, 1948

Some of the more than 100 female protesters took their position in front of the General Electric Company Lamp plant on Rosemont Garden on the morning of March 23, 1948. The United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers union pulled its members from the Lexington lamp plant on a "surprise" work stoppage about  6am. The strike was called because of the company's stalling tactics in talks concerning U.E. recognition as the sole bargaining agent at the plant. Six U.E. members were arrested for blocking an entrance to the plant. General Electric Lighting announced Friday it will close two plants in Kentucky, one in Somerset and the Lexington plant by August 2017. Published in the Lexington Leader March 23, 1948. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

Some of the more than 100 female protesters took their position in front of the General Electric Co. lamp plant on Rosemont Garden on the morning of March 23, 1948. The United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers union pulled its members from the Lexington lamp plant on a “surprise” work stoppage about 6 a.m. The strike was called because of the company’s stalling tactics in talks concerning U.E. recognition as the sole bargaining agent at the plant. Six U.E. members were arrested for blocking an entrance to the plant. General Electric Lighting announced Friday that it will close two plants in Kentucky, one in Somerset and the Lexington plant, by August 2017. Published in the Lexington Leader. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

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Change in beef prices, 1948

Henry Anderson, butcher at the New Sanitary Market at 124 North Broadway, was shown shifting a price tag on round steak from $.85 a pound to $.75 cents a pound on February 13, 1948. The drop in beef prices was attributed to a break in the grain and commonly markets. Today, $.75 would have the same buying power as $7.50. Published in the Lexington Herald February 14, 1948. Herald-Leader Archive Photo.

Henry Anderson, a butcher at the New Sanitary Market at 124 North Broadway, changed a price tag on round steak from 85 cents a pound to 75 cents on Feb. 13, 1948. The drop in beef prices was attributed to a break in the grain and commodity markets. Today, that 75 cents would have the same buying power as $7.50. Published in the Lexington Herald on Feb. 14, 1948. Herald-Leader Archive Photo.

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Barney Miller’s electronics store, 1988

Harry Miller and son Barney Miller inside their electronics store, Barney Miller's, on East Main Street in downtown Lexington, Oct. 21, 1988. The store was opened in 1922 by Barney Miller, Harry's father, as an auto accessory store. He began selling radios about one year after opening and radio became his exclusive product during the depression of the 1930s. After a trip to the 1939 World's Fair in New York where they saw a RCA demonstration of television, the father and son team ordered 10-inch black and white sets to sell. Harry sold the first TV in Kentucky to Warren Wright Jr. at Calumet Farm for $600. Harry took charge of the company in the late 1940s and '50s because his father, who died in 1965, was ill during those years. The younger Barney took over in the 1980s. Photo by Charles Bertram | staff

Harry Miller and son Barney Miller inside their electronics store, Barney Miller’s, on East Main Street in downtown Lexington, Oct. 21, 1988. The store was opened in 1922 by Barney Miller, Harry’s father, as an auto accessory store. He began selling radios about a year after opening, and radio became his exclusive product during the Great Depression. After a trip to the 1939 World’s Fair in New York, where they saw an RCA demonstration of television, the father-and-son team ordered 10-inch black-and-white sets to sell. Ten years later, after returning from World War II and earning a degree from the University of Kentucky, Harry Miller sold the first TV in Kentucky to Warren Wright Jr. at Calumet Farm for $600, Barney Miller said. That price was the equivalent of more than $6,000 today. Harry took charge of the company in the late 1940s and ’50s because his father, who died in 1965, was ill during those years. The younger Barney took over in the 1980s. Harry Miller died in 1999 at age 77. Photo by Charles Bertram | Staff

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First day of school, 1991

Ryan Cook, 6, a first grader at Mill Creek Elementary School waited along with his classmates to go outside for recess on the first day of school August 22, 1991. Today is the first day of school for Fayette County. Photo by Ron Garrison | Staff

Ryan Cook, 6, a first-grader at Mill Creek Elementary School, waited with his classmates to go outside for recess on Aug. 22, 1991, the first day of school. The first day of the 2016-17 school year for Fayette County is Wednesday. Photo by Ron Garrison | Staff

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Walgreen’s advertisement, 1945

Full-page advertisment for Walgreen Drug Store on page A7 of the April 13, 1945 Lexington Leader. Some of the items listed in the ad were a five-piece cooking set for $4.98; toothpicks for $.03; four rolls of Northern toilet Tissue for $.17; an 11-ounce package of bubble bath for $.06. Also in the ad were specials at the lunch counter: fried shrimp, tarter sauce, french fries, cole slaw and rolls for $.45; and a three-decker club sandwich for $.35. At the top is a note that you can purchase war bonds and stamps at the store, located at 140 West Main Street in Lexington, which is today is the site of CenterPointe. In small type across the bottom is a line that says "20% Federal Excise Tax on Toiletries and Luggage."

Full-page advertisement for Walgreen Drug Store on page A7 of the April 13, 1945, Lexington Leader. Some of the items listed in the ad were a five-piece cooking set for $4.98, toothpicks for 3 cents, four rolls of Northern toilet tissue for 17 cents and an 11-ounce package of bubble bath for 6 cents. Also in the ad were specials at the lunch counter: fried shrimp, tarter sauce, french fries, cole slaw and rolls for 45 cents; and a three-decker club sandwich for 35 cents. At the top is a note that you can buy war bonds and stamps at the store, at 140 West Main Street, which is now the site of the CenterPointe project. In small type across the bottom is a line that says “20% federal excise tax on toiletries and luggage.” Click on the image for a closer look. Click here to see an advertisement from another downtown shopping destination during the 1940s, Ben Snyder department store.

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Lexington moonshine raid, 1951

Lexington police officer Harrison Sallee passes confiscated moonshine jars to officer Jesse Wilburn Jan. 11, 1951. The house at 536 Brown Court was raided in what police described as the biggest moonshine raid in local history. 188 gallons of the liquor were well hidden under the kitchen floor, which was accesiable through a trap door. All of the moonshine was stored in fruit jars, officers said. Four men were arrested during the raid. Herald-Leader archive photo

Lexington police officer Harrison Sallee passed confiscated moonshine jars to officer Jesse Wilburn Jan. 11, 1951. The house at 536 Brown Court was the target of what police described as the biggest moonshine raid in local history. 188 gallons of the liquor were well hidden under the kitchen floor, which was accessible through a trap door. All of the moonshine was stored in fruit jars, officers said. Four men were arrested during the raid. Herald-Leader archive photos

Lexington officer James Kenton shows there was not much room for those arrested after the liquor was loaded in a police vehicle, Jan. 11, 1951. The house at 536 Brown Court was raided in what police described as the biggest moonshine raid in local history. 188 gallons of the liquor were well hidden under the kitchen floor, which was accesiable through a trap door. All of the moonshine was stored in fruit jars, officers said. Four men were arrested during the raid. Herald-Leader archive photo

Lexington officer James Kenton showed that there wasn’t much room for those arrested after the liquor was loaded into a police vehicle on Jan. 11, 1951. The confiscated moonshine was later poured down the sewer. Click here to see more moonshine photos from our archives.

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Kentucky Inn demolition, 1954

Demolition of the 150-year-old structure at High and Upper Streets, then known as Kentucky Inn, started in October of 1954. A state office building was to go up on the site to house district offices of the Department of Economic Security and other agencies. Published in the Lexington Leader October 14, 1954. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

Demolition of the 150-year-old structure at High and Upper streets, then known as Kentucky Inn, started in October 1954. A state office building was to go up on the site to house district offices of the Department of Economic Security and other agencies. Published in the Lexington Leader on Oct. 14, 1954. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

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