Photos from the Lexington Herald-Leader archives updated daily

South Park Cinema 6, 1988

Patrons line up outside the South Park Cinema 6 Aug. 17, 1988 to purchase tickets for the six movies being shown - Die Hard, Coming to America, Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Cocktail, Tucker and Clean and Sober. The movie theater was located in the back of the South Park Shopping Center off Nicholasville Road. It later became a discount theater before closing in 2007. Photo by Michael Malone | staff

Moviegoers lined up outside the South Park Cinema 6 on Aug. 17, 1988, to buy tickets for that night’s movies: Die Hard, Coming to America, Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Cocktail, Tucker, and Clean and Sober. The movie theater was in the back of the South Park Shopping Center off Nicholasville Road. It later became a discount theater before closing in 2007.   Photo by Michael Malone | Staff

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Phoenix Hotel demolition, 1981

The wrecking ball brought down part of the Phoenix Hotel on Nov. 17, 1981 in Lexington, Ky. The Phoenix was demolished in 1981 and 1982 by Wallace Wilkinson, who planned to use the site to construct the World Coal Center skyscraper. It was never built and the site eventually became the Park Plaza Apartments and Phoenix Park. Photo by Charles Bertram | Staff

A wrecking ball brought down part of the Phoenix Hotel on Nov. 17, 1981, in Lexington. The Phoenix was demolished in 1981 and 1982 by Wallace Wilkinson, who had planned to build the World Coal Center skyscraper on the site. It was never built, and the site eventually became the Park Plaza Apartments and Phoenix Park.  Photo by Charles Bertram | Staff

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Catholic Church of the Annunciation, 1989

Phillip Quinn of Lexington, a self-employed steeple jack, worked to repair the cross on top of the steeple of the Catholic Church of the Annunciation in Paris, Ky. November 9, 1989. Photo by Clay Owen

Phillip Quinn of Lexington, a self-employed steeplejack, worked to repair the cross on top of the steeple of the Catholic Church of the Annunciation in Paris. Published Nov. 9, 1989.   Photo by Clay Owen

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EKU’s Roy Kidd and Fred Harvey, 1984

Eastern Kentucky University coach Roy Kid, right, with linebacker Fred Harvey on Oct. 10, 1984. Harvey was a four-year starter  for the Colonels and was named a first-team All-American his senior season. EKU’s all-time leading tackler with 503 tackles, Harvey was a two-time OVC defensive player of the year in 1984 and 1986. Eastern travels to play Florida on Friday in the swamp. Photo by Frank Anderson | staff

Eastern Kentucky University coach Roy Kidd with linebacker Fred Harvey on Oct. 10, 1984. Harvey was a four-year starter for the Colonels and was  named a first-team All-American his senior season. EKU’s all-time leading tackler with 503 tackles, Harvey was a two-time OVC defensive player of the year in 1984 and 1986. Eastern travels to play Florida on Friday in The Swamp. Photo by Frank Anderson | Staff

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Corbin football, 1983

Corbin High School football coach Larry "Cotton" Adams checks out a play with his team during practice Sept. 27, 1983. Adams played for Corbin in the early 1960s and served as an assistant for 13 seasons before moving up to head coach in 1981. His 14-year record was 114-46, highlighted by a Class 2A state championship in 1982 and a runner-up finish in 1990. The 2014 Redhounds take on Central in the third round of the Class 3A playoffs today. Photo by Charles Bertram | staff.

Corbin High School football coach Larry “Cotton” Adams checked out a play with his team during practice in September 1983. Adams played for Corbin in the early 1960s and was an assistant for 13 seasons before being named head coach in 1981. His 14-year record was 114-46, highlighted by a Class 2A state championship in 1982 and a runner-up finish in 1990. The 2014 Redhounds take on Central in the third round of the Class 3A playoffs on Friday.    Photo by Charles Bertram | Staff

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Davis Bottom, 1980

Bill Huddleston, left, and his sister Elizabeth Wardle, right,  lived next door to each other in Davis Bottom in 1980. At the time they were paying $85-a-month rent in the low-income community tucked between South Broadway and West High Street. In 2006 the 29 homes in Davis Bottom were torn down to make way for the Newtown Pike Extension. After eight years of work on the infrastructure the first of fourteen affordable housing units for families displaced by the project were dedicated Thursday November 20, 2014, and called Davis Park View.  Photo by Ron Garrison | Staff

Bill Huddleston, left, and his sister Elizabeth Wardle, right, lived next door to each other in Davis Bottom in 1980. At the time they were paying $85 a month in rent in the low-income community tucked between South Broadway and West High Street. In 2006, the 29 homes in Davis Bottom were torn down to make way for the Newtown Pike extension. On Thursday, after eight years of work on the infrastructure, the first of 14 affordable-housing units for families displaced by the project were dedicated. The development is called Davis Park View.  Photo by Ron Garrison | Staff

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Downtown Georgetown, 1976

Downtown Georgetown looking down East Main Street, Oct. 26, 1976. Photo by Shelia Richardson | staff

Downtown Georgetown, with a view down East Main Street, on Oct. 26, 1976.  Photo by Shelia Richardson | Staff

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Crit Luallen, 1984

32-year-old Crit Luallen was interviewed May 14, 1984 after being appointed to the post of Arts Commissioner by Gov. Martha Layne Collins. Ealier this month Gov. Steve Beshear appointed Luallen as the state's No. 2 public official to replace Jerry Abramson, who departed to take a job with the White House to help local officials throughout the country. Luallen, who has served with six other Kentucky governors in high positions was elected state auditor twice, serving from 2003-2012. Photo by Ron Garrison | staff

Crit Luallen, 32, was interviewed on May 14, 1984, after Gov. Martha Layne Collins appointed her as state arts Commissioner. Ealier this month, Gov. Steve Beshear appointed Luallen as lieutenant governor, the state’s No. 2 public official. She replaced Jerry Abramson, who departed to take a job with the White House to help local officials throughout the country. Luallen, who has served with six other Kentucky governors in high positions, was elected state auditor twice, serving from 2003 to 2012.   Photo by Ron Garrison | Staff

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Record cold, 1951

February of 1951 brought record cold temperatures to Lexington. This photo shows cars stranded along Main Street. Published in the Lexington Leader February 2, 1951.

Cars were stranded along Main Street in Lexington during a record cold snap on Feb. 2, 1951.  The low that morning was minus-15 degrees, which remains the record for that date in Lexington. The brutal cold was part of the Great Storm of 1951, when rain and sleet on Jan. 31 was followed by deep cold and snow. The winter storm stretched from Louisiana to Ohio, but Kentucky and Tennessee received the brunt of it. Twenty-five deaths were blamed on the storm, which caused an estimated $100 million in damage — a record at the time.  Published in the Lexington Leader on Feb. 2, 1951.

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Florence Crittenton Home, 1947

A 1947 view of the Thomas Grant house at 519 West Fourth Street in Lexington was built in 1823. It first  became a home for unwed girls about to become mothers in 1894.  Originally known as the Lexington House of Mercy, in 1921 it became  affiliated with a national organization called the Florence Crittenton Home.   Published in the Lexington Leader October 25, 1947. Photo by Ralph Looney | Staff

A 1947 view of the Thomas Grant house at 519 West Fourth Street in Lexington. The house was built in 1823. In 1894, it became a home for unwed girls about to become mothers. Originally known as the Lexington House of Mercy, in 1921 it became affiliated with a national organization called the Florence Crittenton Home. Published in the Lexington Leader on Oct. 25, 1947.   Photo by Ralph Looney | Staff

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