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Snowstorm cripples Kentucky, 1994

Posted on January 18, 2017 | in Uncategorized | by
One of the worst snowstorms in 16 years stunned Kentucky Jan. 18, 1994, closing virtually every main road and airport, causing hundreds of accidents and bringing sub-zero temperatures. Snow depths ranged from 3 inches in southwestern Kentucky to 25 inches in Robertson County, the hardest hit spot in the state. Lexington had 10.2 inches. Louisville had 15.9 inches. Gov. Brereton Jones declared a state of emergency and closed all of the interstates — I-75, I-71, I-64, I-65 and I-24 — and the Blue Grass Parkway. Police, however, were too understaffed to enforce the closures. Most county and state roads were blocked because of accidents or closed by local officials, state police said. Jackknifed tractor-trailers littered the highways. Hundreds of motorists were stranded. There was little room for rescue workers to get through to help them. Shown here, southbound traffic on I-75 was frozen in its tracks near the Corinth exit south of Dry Ridge after the interstate was shut down. Grant County Department of Emergency Services coordinator Rick Willoby said crews can't clear the roads until those trucks are moved, and it's been difficult to find enough equipment to tow tractor-trailers out of the way. In Lexington the high was 4 degrees and the low was -9, breaking a a 64-year-old record by three degrees for the date. City workers spent most of yesterday clearing roads and towing more than 100 cars from the main arteries. Photo by Charles Bertram | staff

One of the worst snowstorms in 16 years stunned Kentucky on Jan. 18, 1994, closing virtually every main road and airport, causing hundreds of accidents and bringing subzero temperatures. Snow depths ranged from 3 inches in southwestern Kentucky to 25 inches in Robertson County, the hardest-hit spot in the state. Lexington had 10.2 inches, and Louisville had 15.9 inches. Gov. Brereton Jones declared a state of emergency and closed all of the interstates — I-75, I-71, I-64, I-65 and I-24 — and the Blue Grass Parkway. Police, however, were too understaffed to enforce the closings. Most county and state roads were blocked because of accidents or were closed by local officials, state police said. Jackknifed tractor-trailers littered the highways. Hundreds of motorists were stranded. There was little room for rescue workers to get through to help them. Shown here, southbound traffic on I-75 was stopped near the Corinth exit south of Dry Ridge after the interstate was shut down. Grant County Department of Emergency Services coordinator Rick Willoby said crews couldn’t clear the roads until the trucks were moved, and it was difficult to find enough equipment to tow tractor-trailers out of the way. In Lexington, the high was 4 degrees and the low was minus-9, breaking a a 64-year-old record for that date by three degrees. City workers spent most of the day clearing roads and towing more than 100 cars from the main arteries. Photo by Charles Bertram | Staff

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