Photos from the Lexington Herald-Leader archives updated daily

Rev. Wayne Smith at church dedication, 1964

Edward Cruze, chairman of Southland Christian Church board, left, Rev. Wayne B. Smith and Rev. Jack Ballard, guest speaker from Decatur, Ga., looked over a surprise gift, a combination television, radio and record-player set, during dedication ceremonies for the church's new location on Hill 'n Dale Road, on November 8, 1964. Rev. Wayne Smith, 87, who for four decades led what is now Lexington's largest congregation died peacefully Tuesday night. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

From left, Edward Cruze, chairman of Southland Christian Church board, the Rev. Wayne B. Smith and Rev. Jack Ballard, guest speaker from Decatur, Ga., looked over a surprise gift, a combination television, radio and record player set, during dedication ceremonies for the church’s new worship center on Hill ‘n’ Dale Road, on Nov. 8, 1964. Smith, 87, who for four decades led what is now Lexington’s largest congregation, died peacefully Tuesday night. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

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Pat Summitt book signing, 1988

Six year-old Kathleen Dawson of Lexington sets on Pat Summit's lap as she autographs a copy of her new book Reach For the Summit,  for Dawson's mother.  Dawson brought Summit a KY Derby Beanie Baby for her son Tyler.  April 28, 1998

Kathleen Dawson, 6, of Lexington sat on Pat Summitt’s lap as Summitt autographed a copy of her book Reach For the Summit for Kathleen’s mother on April 28, 1998 at Joseph-Beth Booksellers in Lexington. Kathleen brought Summitt a Kentucky Derby Beanie Baby for Summitt’s son, Tyler. Summitt signed almost 400 books at the event. Summitt, the winningest coach in Division I college basketball history, who lifted the women’s game to national prominence during her 38-year career at Tennessee, died Tuesday, almost five years after being diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s disease. She was 64.

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Fayette Courthouse renovation, 1949

Workers were placing a new ceiling in the circuit courtroom of the Fayette courthouse on September 8, 1949. This was the first in a series of proposed improvements for the judicial chambers. The new ceiling is designed to give better acoustics and will have a level surface instead of the ornate ceiling. The last trial was held in the courthouse in 2002, and the Lexington History Center opened in 2003. During 2012, the courthouse was closed to the public because paint and asbestos were found in the upper floors. Restoration of the building is currently underway.  Published in the Lexington Herald September 9, 1949. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

Workers placed a new ceiling in the circuit court room of the Fayette County courthouse on Sept. 8, 1949. This was the first in a series of proposed improvements for the judicial chambers. The new ceiling was designed to give better acoustics and had a level surface instead of the ornate ceiling. The last trial was held in the courthouse in 2002, and the Lexington History Center opened in 2003. In 2012, the courthouse was closed because lead paint and asbestos were found in the upper floors. Restoration of the building is currently underway. Published in the Lexington Herald on Sept. 9, 1949. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

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Herald-Leader building, 1979

The Lexington Herald-Leader building on Midland Avenue takes shape in June of 1979. The newspaper offices had been previously located on Short Street downtown behind the Fayette County courthouse. Yesterday the McClatchy Company, owner of the Herald-Leader, announced they would outsource printing to the Gannett Company in Louisville and put the Midland Avenue building up for sale. Photo by John C. Wyatt | StaffThe Lexington Herald-Leader building on Midland Avenue was taking shape in June 1979. The newspaper offices had been on Short Street downtown behind the Fayette County courthouse. On Monday, the McClatchy Company, owner of the Herald-Leader, announced that it will outsource printing to the Gannett Co. in Louisville and put the Midland Avenue building up for sale. Photo by John C. Wyatt | Staff

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Saratoga restaurant, 1978

The dinning room of the Saratoga Restaurant, 856 East High Street in Lexington in April of 1978.The Saratoga was a Chevy Chase landmark and best known for its characters: bookies, college professors, socialites and city hall types. Totsie Rose opened it in 1953 and named it after the famous Saratoga Race Track in New York. Ted Mims owned it from 1977 to 1989. He bought it from Ed Whitlock, who had bought it from Rose. Rob Ramsey and Joe Reilly, co-owners of Ramsey's Diner, owned it for a short time. A Toga menu, served from 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. Monday through Saturday, featured Mrs. McKinney's snappy beer cheese ($2.95), fried bologna ($2.50), cold meatloaf on white ($4.95) and fried egg sandwich ($2.50). The hot plate special for a Derby weekend was chicken and dumplings for $6.95. Photo by John C. Wyatt | staff

The dining room of the Saratoga Restaurant, 856 East High Street in Lexington, in April 1978. The Saratoga was a Chevy Chase landmark and was known for its characters: bookies, college professors, socialites and City Hall types. Tommy “Totsie” Rose opened it in 1953 and named it after the famous Saratoga Race Course in New York. Ted Mims owned it from 1977 to 1989. He bought it from Ed Whitlock, who had bought it from Rose. Rob Ramsey and Joe Reilly, co-owners of Ramsey’s Diner, owned it for a short time. A late-night Toga menu, served from 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. Monday through Saturday, featured Mrs. McKinney’s snappy beer cheese ($2.95), fried bologna ($2.50), cold meatloaf on white ($4.95) and fried egg sandwich ($2.50). The hot plate special for a Derby weekend was chicken and dumplings for $6.95. Click here to see an exterior view of the restaurant. Photo by John C. Wyatt | Staff

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Linda Standafer and children, Perry County, 1992

Linda Standafer held her 1 1/2 year-old daughter Julie Fugate as her other children Doyle Standafer, 4, and Joyce Fugate, 2 1/2 played outside their home in Harveyton in Perry County on June 18, 1992. Their home was near an abandoned coal mine which had been on fire and continued to smolder for the previous 8 months. A hazy cloud of sulfur and coal ash that constantly hangs over the hollow had been aggravating Julie and Joyce's asthma. At the time Federal and State authorities were debating whose responsibility it was to put the fire out. Photo by Charles Bertram | Staff

Linda Standafer held her 1 1/2-year-old daughter Julie Fugate as her other children, Doyle Standafer, 4, and Joyce Fugate, 2 1/2, played outside their home in Harveyton in Perry County on June 18, 1992. Their home was near an abandoned coal mine which had been on fire and continued to smolder for the previous 8 months. A hazy cloud of sulfur and coal ash that constantly hangs over the hollow had been aggravating Julie and Joyce’s asthma. At the time Federal and State authorities were debating whose responsibility it was to put the fire out. Photo by Charles Bertram | Staff

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‘Herky’ and Adolph Rupp, 1959

Adolph “Herky” Rupp Jr., left, and his father, legendary University of Kentucky basketball coach Adolph Rupp watch a 1959 team practice. Herky grew up around UK basketball and played three seasons for his dad, scoring 11 points in 14 career games from 1959 to 1962. He died June 22, 2016. Herald-Leader archive photo

Adolph “Herky” Rupp Jr., left, and his father, legendary University of Kentucky basketball coach Adolph Rupp, watched a 1959 team practice. Herky, who died Wednesday, grew up around UK basketball and played three seasons for his dad, scoring 11 points in 14 career games from 1959 to 1962. Click here to see another photo from our archives of Herky and his father. Herald-Leader archive photo

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Joyland fire, 1965

Fire destroyed the Joyland Casino and other buildings at what had been Joyland Park on Lexington's north side in June of 1965. The park closed in 1964 and the casino was not rebuilt. Joyland Casino was not a place for gambling, which was illegal, but a gathering place for social events and dances. Mary Todd Elementary School and Joyland Bowling alley were built on the site of the park. Published in the Lexington Leader June 21, 1965 in Lexington. Photo by John C. Wyatt

Fire destroyed the Joyland Casino and other buildings at what had been Joyland Park on Lexington’s north side in June 1965. The park had closed in 1964, and the casino was not rebuilt. Joyland Casino was not a place for gambling, which was illegal, but a gathering place for social events and dances. Mary Todd Elementary School and Joyland Bowling alley were built on the site of the park. Published in the Lexington Leader on June 21, 1965. Photo by John C. Wyatt | Staff

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Lexington Municipal Building, 1962

Workmen began tearing the portico off Lexington's Municipal Building on Walnut Street in early June 1962, in preparation to begin construction of a three-story addition to the building. The cost was expected to be $567,000 and would bring the city  building within three feet of the Walnut Street sidewalk. This structure was built in 1928 as Lexington's City Hall, and was envisioned to be the first piece of a municipal complex that would have been established along Barr Street. The building continued to be Lexington's Municipal Building until the fall of 1983 when city government moved into the Ashland Oil, Inc. building on Main Street. That building has previously housed the Lafayette Hotel and later the Central Kentucky Insurance Company and continues to be the headquarters for Lexington's Urban County Government. Currently, the construction of a new government headquarters is being studied. Published in the Lexington Leader June 8, 1962. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

Workmen began tearing the portico off Lexington’s Municipal Building on Walnut Street in early June 1962 in preparation for construction of a three-story addition to the building. The cost was expected to be $567,000 and would bring the city building within three feet of the Walnut Street sidewalk. This structure was built in 1928 as Lexington’s City Hall and was envisioned to be the first piece of a municipal complex that would have been established along Barr Street. The building continued to be Lexington’s municipal building until fall 1983, when city government moved into the Ashland Oil Inc. building on Main Street. That building had previously housed the Lafayette Hotel and later the Central Kentucky Insurance Co., and it continues to be the home of Lexington’s Urban County Government. Currently, the construction of a new government headquarters is being studied. Published in the Lexington Leader on June 8, 1962. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

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Marie ‘The Body’ McDonald visits Lexington, 1948

Marie "The Body" McDonald, right,  posed with Mrs. Danny Bordett, upon her arrival in Lexington's Blue Grass Field in April 1948. She was enroute to visit relatives in Burgin, Ky., her home town.  McDonald was born Cora Marie Frye,  and after her parents divorce she moved with her mother and stepfather to Yonkers, New York. At the age of 15, she began competing in numerous beauty pageants and was named "The Queen of Coney Island", "Miss Yonkers" and "Miss Loew's Paradise". At the age of 15, she dropped out of school and began modeling. In 1939, McDonald was named "Miss New York State". She landed a showgirl role on Broadway at age 17 and shortly thereafter moved to Hollywood. She appeared in films and on stage until her death in 1965. Published in the Lexington Leader April 27, 1948. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

Marie “The Body” McDonald, right, with Mrs. Danny Bordett, arriving at Lexington’s Blue Grass Field in April 1948. She was en route to visit relatives in Burgin, her hometown. McDonald was born Cora Marie Frye in Burgin, and after her parents divorced, she moved with her mother and stepfather to Yonkers, N.Y. At 15, she began competing in numerous beauty pageants and was named “The Queen of Coney Island,” “Miss Yonkers” and “Miss Loew’s Paradise.” At age 15, she dropped out of school and began modeling. In 1939, McDonald was named “Miss New York State.” She landed a showgirl role on Broadway at age 17 and shortly thereafter moved to Hollywood. She appeared in films and on stage until her death in 1965 at age 42. Published in the Lexington Leader on April 27, 1948. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

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