Photos from the Lexington Herald-Leader archives updated daily

Harrodsburg and New Circle roads, 2001

Morning rush-hour traffic heading towards downtown Lexington on Harrodsburg Road at the intersection with New Circle Road, Jan. 25, 2001. The busy Lexington intersection was converted into a double-crossover diamond in late 2011. The crossover, which was the sixth of its kind in the country, eliminates left turns across traffic. Photo by Frank Anderson | staff

Morning rush-hour traffic heading toward downtown Lexington on Harrodsburg Road at New Circle Road, Jan. 25, 2001. The busy Lexington intersection was converted into a double-crossover diamond in late 2011. The crossover, the sixth of its kind in the country, eliminates left turns across traffic. Photo by Frank Anderson | Staff

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Pager and cellphone, 1997

A pagers and cellular telephone available for sale at Radio Shack in Tates Creek Center, Dec. 1. 1997 in Lexington. This photo went with a story on high-tech gadgets for Christmas shoppers. Photo by Greg Perry

A pager and a cellular telephone available for sale at Radio Shack in Lexington’s Tates Creek Center, Dec. 1. 1997. This photo went with a story on high-tech gadgets for Christmas shoppers. Photo by Greg Perry

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Basketball at the Lexington YMCA, 1951

Basketball game at the Lexington YMCA between Calvary Baptist Church and Broadway Christian Church, February, 1951. Herald-Leader archive photo

A basketball game at the Lexington YMCA between Calvary Baptist Church and Broadway Christian Church, February 1951. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

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Line to buy Powerball tickets, 1998

Patrons of Lottoland stood in line July 28, 1998 in Franklin, Ky. near the Tennessee border, to buy tickets for an estimated $250 million Powerball jackpot. Store owner Don Spears said he sold $50,000 to $60,000 worth of Powerball tickets daily during this latest frenzy. From the moment the doors opened at 8 a.m. to closing time at 10 p.m., players lingered in the Lottoland parking lot, awaiting their chance to trod the worn red carpet from the front door to the lottery registers in back. Spears keept the doors locked to satisfy the fire marshal, opening it for only two dozen people at a time. When they reach the L-shaped counter with the registers, they pull out rolls of ten-, twenty- and hundred-dollar bills. "One guy spent $8,000," Spears said. "He had cash." Kentucky Lottery spokesman Rick Redman said Lottoland, which is a quarter mile from an Interstate 65 exit just north of the Tennessee state line, is one of the biggest lottery sellers in the state. It is still open today. A group of machinists who called themselves "The Lucky 13" stepped forward to claim the $295.7 million Powerball jackpot - the biggest prize to that date. Photo by David Stephenson | staff

Lottery ticket buyers stood in line July 28, 1998, at Lottoland in Franklin, near the Tennessee line, to buy tickets for an estimated $250 million Powerball jackpot. Store owner Don Spears said he sold $50,000 to $60,000 worth of Powerball tickets daily during the frenzy. From the moment the doors opened at 8 a.m. to closing time at 10 p.m., players lingered in the Lottoland parking lot, awaiting their chance to tread the worn red carpet from the front door to the lottery registers in back. Spears kept the doors locked to satisfy the fire marshal, opening it for only two dozen people at a time. When they reached the L-shaped counter with the registers, they pulled out rolls of ten-, twenty- and hundred-dollar bills. “One guy spent $8,000,” Spears said. “He had cash.” Kentucky Lottery spokesman Rick Redman said Lottoland, a quarter-mile from an Interstate 65 exit just north of the Tennessee line, was one of the biggest lottery sellers in the state. It remains open today. A group of machinists who called themselves The Lucky 13 stepped forward to claim the $295.7 million Powerball jackpot — the biggest prize to that date. Photo by David Stephenson | Staff

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The first Long John Silver’s, 1981

Gene Stathas leaves after dinning June 8, 1981 at the very first Long John Silver's location at 301 Southland Drive in Lexington. Origionally called the Cape Codder, Jerrico Inc. renamed it Long John Silver's and opened for business on Aug. 18 1969. Lexington-based Jerrico also operated Jerry's restaurants and founded Fazoli's. Jerrico was taken private in 1989 in a $626 million leveraged buyout, leaving Long John Silver's with $275 million in high-interest debt. The company struggled with the debt, and Long John Silver's sought bankruptcy protection in June 1998. A year later, A&W bought the chain for $220 million and then was bought by Louisville-based Yum Brands several years later. Private investors made a successful bid to buy the LJS Brand in September 2011. There are currently just over 1,100 locations worldwide, however this origonal location is now a styling salon. Photo by Charles Bertram | staff

Gene Stathas left after eating  at the very first Long John Silver’s on June 8, 1981, at 301 Southland Drive in Lexington. It originally was called the Cape Codder,  and Jerrico Inc. renamed it Long John Silver’s and opened for business on Aug. 18, 1969. Lexington-based Jerrico also operated Jerry’s restaurants and founded Fazoli’s. Jerrico was taken private in 1989 in a $626 million leveraged buyout, leaving Long John Silver’s with $275 million in high-interest debt. The company struggled with the debt, and Long John Silver’s sought bankruptcy protection in June 1998. A year later, A&W bought the chain for $220 million and then was bought by Louisville-based Yum Brands several years later. Private investors made a successful bid to buy the LJS Brand in September 2011. Currently, there are more than 1,100 Long John Silver’s restaurants worldwide, but the restaurant above closed on July 3, 1991, and the property is now a styling salon. Photo by Charles Bertram | Staff

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Ben Ali Theatre closes, 1964

Ben Ali Theater usher Joe Powers, on the ladder, removed titles from the marquee for the last time in September 1964. The Ben Ali Theater, located at 121 East Main Street, was built by Elmendorf Farm owner, James Ben Ali Haggin and opened on September 23, 1913. The building was demolished in 1965 to make way for a parking lot. Published in the Lexington Herald September 9, 1964. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

Ben Ali Theatre usher Joe Powers, on the ladder, removed titles from the marquee for the last time in September 1964. The Ben Ali Theatre, at 121 East Main Street, was built by Elmendorf Farm owner James Ben Ali Haggin, and it opened Sept. 23, 1913. The building was demolished in 1965 to make way for a parking lot. Published in the Lexington Herald on Sept. 9, 1964. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

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Clay County flood, 1992

Billy Ray Hubbard sat in silence July 25, 1992 on tons of rubble that had washed down around his mobile home during a flash flood on Bear Creek in Clay County. The small blue and white trailer, where his son and daughter-in-law lived, was swept 50 feet in the flood and came to rest against his home. Photo by Tom Marks | Staff

Billy Ray Hubbard sat in silence on July 25, 1992, on tons of rubble that had washed down around his mobile home during a flash flood on Bear Creek in Clay County. The small blue-and-white trailer, where his son and daughter-in-law lived, was swept 50 feet in the flood and came to rest against his home. Photo by Tom Marks | Staff

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Blue Grass Field terminal, 1966

A photo of the terminal at what was then called Blue Grass Field, was one of the pictures featured in a story by Herald-Leader reporter Ronnie Thompson in 1966. Thompson wrote about the Lexington airport's high ranking in airport operations. Later that year in October, Eastern Air Lines announced it would launch non-stop jet flights to New York City. Published in the Lexington Herald January 16, 1966. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

A photo of the terminal at what was then called Blue Grass Field was one of the pictures featured in a story by Herald-Leader reporter Ronnie Thompson in 1966. Thompson wrote about the Lexington airport’s high ranking in airport operations. In October that year, Eastern Air Lines announced that it would launch nonstop jet flights to New York. Published in the Lexington Herald on Jan. 16, 1966. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

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African-American playground, 1954

One of the playgrounds in the African American section of the Bluegrass-Aspendale housing project in Lexington's east side in April 1954. An eight-foot fence separated blacks and whites from 1939 until January 1974. Published in the Lexington Herald-Leader April 18, 1954. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

One of the playgrounds in the African-American section of the Bluegrass-Aspendale housing project in Lexington’s east side in April 1954. An eight-foot fence separated blacks and whites from 1939 until January 1974. Published in the Lexington Herald-Leader on April 18, 1954. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

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Stoll Field adds lighting, 1946

One of six 100-foot steel poles erected on Stoll Field for illumination of night football games in September of 1946. The field has been in use since 1880, but the concrete stands were opened in October 1916, and closed following the 1972 season, replaced by Commonwealth Stadium. Published in the Lexington Leader September 16, 1946. Herald-Leader Archive Photo.

One of six 100-foot steel poles erected on Stoll Field for illumination of night football games in September 1946. The field had been in use since 1880. The concrete stands were opened in October 1916 and were closed after the 1972 season, replaced by Commonwealth Stadium. Published in the Lexington Leader on Sept. 16, 1946. Herald-Leader Archive Photo.

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