Photos from the Lexington Herald-Leader archives updated daily

Centre College Homecoming rite, 1960

Freshman Bill Sykes was given an involuntery haircut as part of Centre College's Homecoming, in autum 1960. Centre celebrates Homecoming 2014 this weekend. Published in the Herald-Leader Oct. 23, 1960.

Freshman Bill Sykes was given an involuntary haircut as part of Centre College’s Homecoming in autum 1960. Centre celebrates Homecoming 2014 this weekend. Published in the Herald-Leader on Oct. 23, 1960.

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One-room school, 1982

Teacher Meredith Slone surveyed his 18 pupils at Daniels Creek School in Banner, Ky., Tuesday, August 24, 1982. Daniels Creek School, which began its 59th school year the day before, was one of only three one-room schools remaining in Kentucky at the time. The school offered grades one through eight. The school was closed at the end of the 1986-87 school year.  Photo by Charles Bertram | Staff

Teacher Meredith Slone surveyed his 18 pupils at Daniels Creek School in the Floyd County community of Banner on Aug. 24, 1982. Daniels Creek School, which began its 59th school year the day before, was one of only three one-room schools remaining in Kentucky at the time. The school was for students in first through eighth grades. The school was closed at the end of the 1986-87 school year.  Photo by Charles Bertram | Staff

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UK at LSU, 1998

LSU running back Kevin Faulk, left, congratulated Kentucky quarterback Tim Couch after the Cats defeated LSU,  39-36, on the road on Oct. 17, 1998. It's the last time that Kentucky has won at the stadium known as Death Valley. LSU leads the overall series with 39 wins to Kentucky's 16 wins. There was one tie, in 1953.  Photo by Frank Anderson | Staff

LSU running back Kevin Faulk, left, congratulated Kentucky quarterback Tim Couch after the Cats defeated LSU, 39-36, on the road on Oct. 17, 1998. It’s the last time that Kentucky has won at the stadium known as Death Valley. LSU leads the overall series with 39 wins to Kentucky’s 16 wins. There was one tie, in 1953.   Photo by Frank Anderson | Staff

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Tubby Smith at Midnight Madness, 1998

University of Kentucky men's basketball coach Tubby Smith entered Memorial Coliseum Oct. 16, 1998 dressed as boxing promoter Don King as part of the Midnight Madness "Main Event." The 17th annual Midnight Madness, which signals the start of the team's practice, drew its usual capacity crowd of 8,700. The coach of the national defending champions said he was nervous because he felt like anyone else in the stands - not knowing how his team will do this year. Photo by Janet Worne | staff

University of Kentucky men’s basketball coach Tubby Smith entered Memorial Coliseum on Oct. 16, 1998, dressed as boxing promoter Don King as part of the Midnight Madness “Main Event.” The 17th annual Midnight Madness, which signals the start of the team’s practice, drew its usual capacity crowd of 8,700. The coach of the national defending champions said he was nervous because he felt like anyone else in the stands: not knowing how his team would do that season.  Photo by Janet Worne | Staff

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UK midnight practice, 1982

The University of Kentucky's first "Midnight Practice", later called Midnight Madness, occurred October 14, 1982 in Memorial Coliseum. Troy McKinley, right, and Derrick Hord led the way through a paper banner that read "The Cats will Run at 12:01." Photo by E. Martin Jessee | Staff

The University of Kentucky’s first “Midnight Special,” which has evolved into Big Blue Madness, was Oct. 14, 1982, in Memorial Coliseum. More than 8,500 fans attended that first practice in the 12,000-seat Memorial Coliseum. Troy McKinley, right, and Derrick Hord led the way through a paper banner that read “The Cats will Run at 12:01.” The event was the brainchild of then-coach Joe B. Hall, according to UKAthletics.com. Hall was seeking to pump up fan interest for the coming season. He was inspired by a similar event organized by Maryland coach Lefty Driesell nearly a decade earlier. Kentucky’s “Special” or “Madness” was held in Memorial Coliseum until 2005, when it moved to Rupp Arena.  Photo by E. Martin Jessee | Staff

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Downtown Cynthiana, 1951

Downtown Cynthiana looking down Main Street (U.S. 27), from the courthouse, January 1951.

Downtown Cynthiana’s  Main Street (U.S. 27), viewed from the courthouse, January 1951.

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Muhammad Ali visits Lexington, 1995

Saida Grundy, 13, got a hug from Muhammad Ali after she presented him with a sculpture by Lexington artist LaVon Williams during Ali's visit to Lexington's Dunbar Community Center on Saturday February 18, 1995. During a daylong visit to the city, Ali, a Louisville native, mingled with the public in the morning, then attended a University of Kentucky basketball game and a reception in his honor afterward. He posed for pictures, signed autographs and playfully shadowboxed with kids. The visit, part of African-American History Month, also was intended to promote the play "Ali" the next weekend at the Lexington Opera House. Ali, then 53, did not speak much during his 2 1/2-hour morning visit with about 300 at Dunbar Community Center. He suffers from Parkinson's disease, and talking is difficult for him. But his actions said plenty to the crowd. He cuddled and kissed babies, embraced his fans and signed everything from scraps of paper to boxing gloves to a Muhammad Ali pinball machine. By the time he left, he had a smear of pink lipstick on his left cheek and dozens of small boys clutching at his coattails. Photo by David Perry | Staff

Saida Grundy, 13, got a hug from Muhammad Ali after she presented him with a sculpture by Lexington artist LaVon Williams during Ali’s visit to Lexington’s Dunbar Community Center on Feb. 18, 1995. During a daylong visit to the city, Ali, a Louisville native, mingled with the public in the morning, then attended a University of Kentucky basketball game and a reception in his honor afterward. He posed for pictures, signed autographs and playfully shadowboxed with kids. The visit, part of African-American History Month, was intended to promote the play Ali the next weekend at the Lexington Opera House. Ali, then 53, did not speak much during his 2 1/2-hour morning visit with about 300 at Dunbar Community Center. He suffers from Parkinson’s disease, and talking is difficult for him. But he cuddled and kissed babies, embraced his fans and signed scraps of paper, boxing gloves and a Muhammad Ali pinball machine. By the time he left, he had a smear of pink lipstick on his left cheek and dozens of small boys clutching at his coattails. Photo by David Perry | Staff

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Kentucky Theatre, 1987

Kentucky Theatre manager Fred Mills inspected fire damage to the theatre October 6, 1987. A fire in a restaurant next door to the Kentucky caused extensive smoke and water damage which caused it's closure for the next five years. During this time a number of renovations were conducted and the grand reopening was held on April 11, 1992. Photo by John C. Wyatt | Staff

Kentucky Theatre manager Fred Mills inspected fire damage on Oct. 6, 1987. A fire in a restaurant next door to the theater caused extensive smoke and water damage, and it was closed for five years. In that  time, it was extensively renovated, and the grand reopening was held April 11, 1992.  Photo by John C. Wyatt | Staff

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Aylesford House, 1944

Aylesford House, originally known as Elley Villa,  a Greek Revival residence at 320 Linden Walk, photographed in 1944. The house was built in mid-1850s by John McMurtry, noted Lexington architect-builder, for William R. Elley,  a Mississippi cotton planter who's wife Louisa had grown up in the nearby Pope Villa. McMurtry also designed Ingleside and Loudoun, among other houses.  Several outbuildings and a race course once existed behind the villa. The property passed to John L. Barclay and then to Judge William C. Goodloe, who became owner of the house in the 1860's.  In 1875 St. Joseph Hospital was established there and operated until 1878. General W.T. Withers next occupied the house.  Oliver Perry Alford purchased the property in 1885 and named it Aylesford.  It was occupied by the University of Kentucky chapter, Kappa Alpha fraternity, from 1925 to about 1942, when the chapter folded due to the war.  It is now a private residence.

Aylesford House, originally known as Elley Villa, a Greek Revival residence at 320 Linden Walk, photographed in 1944. The house was built in the mid-1850s by John McMurtry, a noted Lexington architect and builder, for William R. Elley, a Mississippi cotton planter whose wife, Louisa, had grown up in the nearby Pope Villa. McMurtry also designed Ingleside and Loudoun, among other houses. Several outbuildings and a race course once existed behind the villa. The property passed to John L. Barclay and then to Judge William C. Goodloe, who became owner of the house in the 1860s. In 1875, St. Joseph Hospital was established there and operated until 1878. General W.T. Withers next occupied the house. Oliver Perry Alford bought the property in 1885 and named it Aylesford. It was occupied by the University of Kentucky chapter of the Kappa Alpha fraternity from 1925 to about 1942, when the chapter folded because of the war. It is now a private home.

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Carp fisherman, 1948

Shadrach Gill posed with 26-pound, 11 ounce carp he caught on North Elkhorn Creek in 1948. Published in the Lexington Herald-Leader April 25, 1948.

Shadrach Gill posed with 26-pound, 11-ounce carp he caught on North Elkhorn Creek in 1948. Published in the Lexington Herald-Leader on April 25, 1948.

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