Photos from the Lexington Herald-Leader archives updated daily

Downtown Beattyville, 1987

Downtown Beattyville in Lee County as seen on January 8, 1987. Photo by Charles Bertram | Staff

Downtown Beattyville in Lee County on Jan. 8, 1987. Photo by Charles Bertram | Staff

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Bear-wrestling at Fayette Mall, 1980

Victor the wrestling Bear took on all commers during Fayette Mall's ninth anniversary celebration in September 1980. Victor, stood 6'9" tall and weighed around 650 pounds. Anyone over the age of 18 could wrestle Victor. Photo by Ron Garrison | Staff

Victor the wrestling bear took on all comers during Fayette Mall’s ninth anniversary celebration on Sept. 24, 1980. Victor was declawed and defanged, and he was muzzled when he wrestled. He reportedly stood 6 feet, 9 inches tall and weighed about 650 pounds, although those numbers varied, according to this story. Anyone older than 18 could wrestle Victor. Photo by Ron Garrison | Staff

University of Kentucky wrestler Fred Ringo accepted the challenge and took on Victor the traveling wrestling bear at Fayette Mall on Wednesday September 24, 1980, as part of the mall's ninth anniversary celebration. Victor stood 6'9" tall and weighed over 650 pounds. Anyone over the age of 18 could wrestle Victor. Photo by Ron Garrison | Staff

University of Kentucky wrestler Fred Ringo accepted the challenge and took on Victor the traveling wrestling bear at Fayette Mall on Sept. 24, 1980, as part of the mall’s ninth anniversary celebration. Victor stood 6 feet, 9 inches tall and weighed about 650 pounds. Anyone older than 18 could wrestle Victor. Photo by Ron Garrison | Staff

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Nazi war dog comes home with G.I., 1946

U.S. Army Sgt. James Hellard, who returned from Germany August 31, 1946 posed for an action photo with his adopted Nazi-trained war dog, Tiger, at his home in Lexington. Tiger, a 90 pound police dog was captured in May 1945 near Camp Dachau by a soldier in Sgt. Hellard's company. Taken from an SS captain, he was brought back to the camp to be a mascot. When first brought to camp he exhibited a hatred for G.I.'s by biting them, thus earning the name Tiger. After some detraining by Sgt. Hellard he gradually lost his intense dislike for Americans. Published in the Lexington Herald October 2, 1946. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

U.S. Army Sgt. James Hellard, who returned from Germany on Aug. 31, 1946, posed for an action photo with his adopted Nazi-trained war dog, Tiger, at his home in Lexington. Tiger, a 90-pound police dog, was captured in May 1945 near Camp Dachau by a soldier in Hellard’s company. Taken from an SS captain, he was brought back to the camp to be a mascot. When first brought to camp, he exhibited a hatred for G.I.’s by biting them, thus earning the name Tiger. After some retraining by Hellard, he gradually lost his intense dislike for Americans. Published in the Lexington Herald on Oct. 2, 1946. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

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Kentucky Guard Ed Davender, 1984

University of Kentucky basketball player Ed Davender, put up a shot in an exhibition game November 11, 1984 in Rupp Arena. Considered one of the most under-appreciated guards in UK basketball history, died late Thursday night after suffering a massive heart attack on Tuesday. He was 49. Photo by David Perry | Staff

University of Kentucky basketball player Ed Davender, put up a shot in an exhibition game November 11, 1984 in Rupp Arena. Considered one of the most under-appreciated guards in UK basketball history, died late Thursday night after suffering a massive heart attack on Tuesday. He was 49. Photo by David Perry | Staff

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UK baseball light tower, 1987

Workers Shane Sowards, left, and Mike Powell, both from Ft. Wayne, Ind., prepared to attach a bank of lights to one of six newly installed lighting towers at the University of Kentucky's baseball field at the Shively Sports Complex on September 14, 1987. The lights, a $200,000 project were in place in time for the team's opening game September 19. The six new towers contained a total of 180 lights. Photo by Frank Anderson | Staff

Workers Shane Sowards, left, and Mike Powell, both from Fort Wayne, Ind., prepared to attach a bank of lights to one of six newly installed lighting towers at the University of Kentucky’s baseball field at the Shively sports complex on Sept. 14, 1987. The lights, a $200,000 project, were in place in time for the team’s opening game Sept. 19. The six new towers contained a total of 180 lights. Photo by Frank Anderson | Staff

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Morehead State basketball coach Dick Fick, 1993

Morehead State basketball coach Dick Fick reacts to an officials call during the Eagle's 97-61 loss to Kentucky at Rupp Arena Dec. 17, 1993. The flamboyant coach led the Eagles for six rollicking years (1991-97) and compiled a 64-101 record. He was known so well known for his sideline antics that the late Jim Valvano of ESPN handed out the "Dick Fick Award," which went weekly to the coach who showed the most sideline animation. Once, in a game in Cincinnati, Fick held up a three-point sign to the UC student body every time Morehead made a three-pointer. His most famous moment came in 1992 in a game against Kentucky in Rupp Arena. MSU was victimized by an over-the-back call. In response, Fick collapsed flat on his back, his arms elevated straight up in disgust. But Fick could be every bit as clever as he was ebullient. One summer, he picked up a newspaper and saw that University of Cincinnati center Art Long had been arrested for punching a police horse. He was immediately on the phone to Bearcats Coach Bob Huggins. "Bob, I can help you," Fick said. "I know there is no way Art Long punched that horse." Huggins: "How?" Fick: "He's still in the lane from when we played you last year." In 1997, Morehead refused to extend Fick's contract and in 1999, he publicly admitted that he was an alcoholic after he was in and out of alcohol treatment programs. He wound up back in his hometown of Joliet, Ill., part-time assistant coaching at St. Francis of Illinois, a NAIA school. On April 28, 2003, the 50-year-old was found dead in the Joliet apartment where he lived by himself. Photo by Frank Anderson | staff

Morehead State basketball coach Dick Fick reacted to an official’s call during the Eagles’ 97-61 loss to Kentucky at Rupp Arena on Dec. 17, 1993. The flamboyant coach led the Eagles for six rollicking years (1991-97) and compiled a 64-101 record. He was so well-known for his sideline antics that the late Jim Valvano of ESPN handed out the “Dick Fick Award,” which went weekly to the coach who showed the most sideline animation. Once, in a game in Cincinnati, Fick held up a three-point sign to the UC student body every time Morehead made a three-pointer. His most famous moment came in 1992, in a game against Kentucky in Rupp Arena. MSU was victimized by an over-the-back call. In response, Fick collapsed flat on his back, his arms elevated straight up in disgust. But Fick could be every bit as clever as he was ebullient. One summer, he picked up a newspaper and saw that University of Cincinnati center Art Long had been arrested for punching a police horse. He was immediately on the phone to Bearcats Coach Bob Huggins. “Bob, I can help you,” Fick said. “I know there is no way Art Long punched that horse.” Huggins: “How?” Fick: “He’s still in the lane from when we played you last year.” In 1997, Morehead refused to extend Fick’s contract, and in 1999, he publicly admitted that he was an alcoholic after he was in and out of alcohol treatment programs. He wound up back in his hometown, Joliet, Ill., as a part-time assistant coach at University of St. Francis, an NAIA school. On April 28, 2003, Fick, 50, was found dead in the Joliet apartment where he lived by himself. Photo by Frank Anderson | Staff

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Eddie Arcaro at Keeneland, April 1953

Jockey Eddie Arcaro at Keeneland Race Course in April 1953. Arcaro was a Hall of Fame jockey who won more American classic races than any other jockey in history and is the only rider to have won the Triple Crown twice, aboard Whirlaway in 1941 and Citation in 1948. He is widely regarded as the greatest jockey in the history of American Thoroughbred horse racing. The Keeneland spring meet concludes this Friday. Herald-Leader Arichive Photo

Jockey Eddie Arcaro at Keeneland Race Course in April 1953. Arcaro was a Hall of Fame jockey who won more American classic races than any other jockey in history, and he is the only rider to have won the Triple Crown twice, aboard Whirlaway in 1941 and Citation in 1948. He is widely regarded as the greatest jockey in the history of American Thoroughbred horse racing. The Keeneland spring meet concludes this Friday. Herald-Leader Arichive Photo

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Pearl Jam plays Rupp Arena, 2003

Singer Eddie Vedder greets the Rupp Arena crowd April 21, 2003 as Pearl Jam played Lexington for the first time. The Seattle band, which has been together since 1990, played before 10,000 at Rupp Arena. 13 years later to the week, the reticent torchbearer of the grunge generation of the 90's visits Rupp Arena for a nearly sol-out show. Photo by Mark Cornelison | staff

Singer Eddie Vedder greeted the Rupp Arena crowd on April 21, 2003, as Pearl Jam played Lexington for the first time. The Seattle band, which has been together since 1990, played before 10,000 fans at Rupp Arena. Thirteen years later to the week, the reticent torchbearer of the grunge generation of the 90’s visits Rupp Arena for a nearly sold-out show. Photo by Mark Cornelison | Staff

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Fayette Mall, 1985

An aerial view of Fayette Mall, May 13, 1985. Nicholasville Road runs from left to right across the bottom. The left side of the mall at this time was a Sears store, one of the anchors of the shopping center. In May 1993, the mall expaned, adding nearly two dozen merchants in a new south wing, in the area to the left of Sears in the picture. The expansion made it the Kentucky's largest mall. In 2006, The Plaza at Fayette Mall, a shopping center with a Cinemark Theatres and restaurants, opened in the area on the far left side of the photo. Across the top of the picture is Shillito Park. The park's pool, whcih opened in the summer of 1988, is located just to the left of the curve in the road. Photo by Nick Nickerson | staff

An aerial view of Fayette Mall on May 13, 1985. Nicholasville Road runs horizontally near the bottom. The left side of the mall at that time was a Sears store, one of the anchors of the shopping center. In May 1993, the mall expanded, adding nearly two dozen businesses in a new south wing, in the area to the left of Sears in the picture. The expansion made it Kentucky’s largest mall. In 2006, The Plaza at Fayette Mall, a shopping center with Cinemark Theatres and restaurants, opened in the area on the far left side of the photo. Across the top of the picture is Shillito Park. The park’s pool, which opened in summer 1988, is just to the left of the sweeping curve in the road. Photo by Nick Nickerson | Staff

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Millersburg kids with pet monkey, 1951

Mary Jo and Robert Dale Feeback, who lived near Millersburg, posed for a photo with their pet monkey in February 1951. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

Mary Jo and Robert Dale Feeback, who lived near Millersburg, posed for a photo with their pet monkey in February 1951. Herald-Leader Archive Photo 

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