Photos from the Lexington Herald-Leader archives updated daily

Golfer Marion Miley, 1941

Pioneer golfer Marion Miley, 1941. In an era before women’s professional golf, the Lexington resident won almost every important women’s amateur championship except the national title, which eluded her in some close tournaments. Miley and her mother were brutally murdered during a robbery at Lexington Country club 75 years ago this week — a crime that sent three men to the electric chair. Miley’s life and tragic death are explored in a new Kentucky Educational Television documentary film, “Forgotten Fame: The Marion Miley Story”. KET will begin airing the documentary today. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

Pioneer golfer Marion Miley in 1941. In an era before women’s professional golf, the Lexington resident won almost every important women’s amateur championship except the national title, which eluded her in some close tournaments. Miley and her mother were brutally murdered 75 years ago this week during a robbery at Lexington Country club — a crime that sent three men to the electric chair. Miley’s life and tragic death are explored in a new Kentucky Educational Television documentary film, “Forgotten Fame: The Marion Miley Story.” KET will begin airing the documentary Thursday. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

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Pizza delivery for Big Blue Madness campers, 2009

Kentucky basketball player DeMarcus Cousins called out with pizza as UK players served pizza and signed autographs and coach John Calipari signed for fans who were camping out for Midnight Madness on Friday October 2, 2009 in Lexington. The team frequently brings campers pizza during their stay on the grounds outside Memorial Coliseum. This years campout for Big Blue Madness tickets starts at 5 a.m. Wednesday and ends when tickets are distributed at 10 p.m. Friday. Photo by Mark Cornelison | Staff

Kentucky basketball player DeMarcus Cousins was among the UK players who served pizza and signed autographs for fans who camp out for Big Blue Madness on Oct. 2, 2009, in Lexington. Coach John Calipari also signed autographs for fans. The team frequently brings pizza to campers during their stay on the grounds outside Memorial Coliseum. This year’s camp-out for Big Blue Madness tickets began at 5 a.m. Wednesday and ends when tickets are distributed at 10 p.m. Friday. Photo by Mark Cornelison | Staff

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Arnold Palmer in Lexington, 1989

Golf legend Arnold Palmer got a tour of the Child Development Center of the Bluegrass in Lexington from Executive Director Peggy Stephens Sept. 11, 1989. Palmer visited two United Way of the Bluegrass agencies, the Center for Creative Living, a day care program for senior citizens, and the Child Development Center, which provides early intervention and therapy services for children with and without disabilities. Palmer, a spokesman for GTE throughout the United States, was invited to tour the agencies by Bob Calafell, chairman of this year's United Way general campaign and vice president and general area manager of GTE South. At the Child Development Center, Palmer signed autographs, watched children eat and play, and encouraged a boy undergoing physical therapy. "I feel grateful that I'm in a position to help raise money," Palmer said. "I do (these things) because I feel like if I can help give other people the same opportunities I've had, that's good enough for me. When I . . . see what is happening in a place like this or in children's hospitals, I think of how fortunate we are that we do have people that really do care. That is something you just can't replace." Palmer, who made golf popular for masses, died Sept. 25, 2016. Photo by Clay Owen

Golf legend Arnold Palmer got a tour of the Child Development Center of the Bluegrass in Lexington from Executive Director Peggy Stephens Sept. 11, 1989. Palmer visited two United Way of the Bluegrass agencies, the Center for Creative Living, a day care program for senior citizens, and the Child Development Center, which provides early intervention and therapy services for children with and without disabilities. Palmer, a spokesman for GTE throughout the United States, was invited to tour the agencies by Bob Calafell, chairman of this year’s United Way general campaign and vice president and general area manager of GTE South. At the Child Development Center, Palmer signed autographs, watched children eat and play, and encouraged a boy undergoing physical therapy. “I feel grateful that I’m in a position to help raise money,” Palmer said. “I do (these things) because I feel like if I can help give other people the same opportunities I’ve had, that’s good enough for me. When I . . . see what is happening in a place like this or in children’s hospitals, I think of how fortunate we are that we do have people that really do care. That is something you just can’t replace.” Palmer, who made golf popular for masses, died Sept. 25, 2016. Photo by Clay Owen

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Lexington police reloading ammunition, 1949

Patrolman Wallace McMurray reloading amunition in the basement of the offices of the Lexington Police Department, June 7, 1949. Under a new program, all officers go through pistol practice and to reduce cost, McMurray is responsible for melting and casting bullets and re-loading and re-priming empty cartridge cases for the officers. The equipment he is using was recently purchased to keep up with the demand of the training. Published in the Lexington Leader June 8, 1949.

Patrolman Wallace McMurray reloaded ammunition in the Lexington Police Department basement on June 7, 1949. Under a new program, all officers went through pistol practice, and to reduce cost, McMurray was responsible for casting bullets, and reloading empty casings for the officers. The equipment he used was recently bought to keep up with the demand of the training. Click on the image for a close look at his work station and supplies. Published in the Lexington Leader on June 8, 1949.

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Big Bertha cleaning, 1985

Lexington Center employee Craig King held the ladder for Bob Stoops as he checked the speakers on 'Big Bertha' on March 18, 1985. The speaker cluster had been dropped to the Rupp Arena floor for a complete cleaning prior to the NCAA Final Four tournament later that month.

Lexington Center employee Craig King held the ladder for Bob Stoops as he checked the speakers on Big Bertha on March 18, 1985. The speaker cluster had been dropped to the Rupp Arena floor for a complete cleaning prior to the NCAA Final Four later that month. A new center-hung scoreboard and sound system is being added to a more tech-friendly Rupp Arena. Photo by Charles Bertram | staff

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Commonwealth Stadium, 1975

Aerial view of Commonwealth Stadium during Kentucky's game against Maryland September 27, 1975. The game ended up a tie, 10-10. UK's record that season under coach Fran Curci was 2-8-1. The area around Commonwealth Stadium, built in 1973, has changed dramatically. At bottom is the intersection of University and Cooper Drives. The Kentucky Wildcats look for their first win of the season when they take on the New Mexico State Aggies this afternoon at 4pm. Photo by Ron Garrison | Staff

Aerial view of Commonwealth Stadium during Kentucky’s game against Maryland on Sept. 27, 1975. The game ended up a tie, 10-10. UK’s record that season under coach Fran Curci was 2-8-1. The area around Commonwealth Stadium, built in 1973, has changed dramatically. At bottom is the intersection of University and Cooper Drives. The Kentucky Wildcats look for their first Southeastern Conference win of the season at 7:30 p.m. Saturday when they take on South Carolina. Photo by Ron Garrison | Staff

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Henry Clay, Lafayette football, 1981

Henry Clay's Robert Wakefield, right, tried to elude the grasp of Lafayette defender Paul Vines in their game October 30, 1981 at Henry Clay. The Blue Devils won 31-6 and went on to claim the school's only state football title that year. This years squard takes on No. 7 Lafayette tonight. Photo by Charles Bertram | Staff

Henry Clay’s Robert Wakefield, right, tried to elude the grasp of Lafayette defender Paul Vines in their game Oct. 30, 1981, at Henry Clay. The Blue Devils won 31-6 and went on to finish the year undefeated, claiming the school’s only state football title. This year’s squad takes on No. 7 Lafayette on Friday night. Photo by Charles Bertram | Staff

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Lexington’s Union Station, 1944

Lexington's Union Station located on Main Street, 1944. It had opened with great fanfare on Aug. 4, 1907, with the arrival of C&O passenger train No. 24. A crowd estimated at 3,000 met the train. The terminal fronted Main Street, just west of Walnut Street, which has been renamed Martin Luther King Boulevard. The exterior was built with red and yellow brick, and green and red glass. The lobby was in the center rotunda, which was 50 by 80 feet, with a central dome 50 feet high. The lobby had a Roman arch ceiling and six oak waiting benches. The last passenger train (the George Washington) departed from the station on May 9, 1957. Union Station was closed because of high operating overhead and low passenger travel. In March 1960, the building was demolished. The current building at the site houses the Lexington Police Department, the Fayette County clerk’s office and the downtown's busiest parking garage, the Annex Garage.

Lexington’s Union Station on Main Street, 1944. It had opened with great fanfare on Aug. 4, 1907, with the arrival of C&O passenger train No. 24. A crowd estimated at 3,000 people met the train. The terminal fronted Main Street, just west of Walnut Street, which has been renamed Martin Luther King Boulevard. The exterior was built with red and yellow brick, and green and red glass. The lobby was in the center rotunda, which was 50 by 80 feet, with a central dome 50 feet high. The lobby had a Roman arch ceiling and six oak waiting benches. The last passenger train (the George Washington) departed from the station on May 9, 1957. Union Station was closed because of high operating overhead and low passenger travel. In March 1960, the building was demolished. The current building at the site houses the Lexington Police Department, the Fayette County clerk’s office and the downtown’s busiest parking garage, the Annex Garage. Click here to see more images of Union Station from our archives.

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Baynham shoe store, 1949

Toddler Kathy Lewis being fitted by S.B. Foley with pair of shoes at Baynham Shoe Company, Feb. 4, 1949. The popular shoe store founded by three brothers at 135 East Main Street, operated for more then 50 years before closing in the 1970s. Their motto was "shoes of distinction". Around the time of this photo, they were advertising white buck shoes for men for $4.95 a pair. The site of where the store was is where Phoenix Park is.

Toddler Kathy Lewis was fitted by S.B. Foley with a pair of shoes at Baynham Shoe Co. on Feb. 4, 1949. The popular shoe store, founded by three brothers at 135 East Main Street, operated for more then 50 years before closing in the 1970s. The store’s motto was “shoes of distinction.” About the time of this photo, men’s white buck shoes were advertised for $4.95 a pair. Phoenix Park is where the store used to be.

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Shillito’s advertisement, 1976

Full-page advertisement in the Herald-Leader celebrating Shillito's department store's fifth anniversary in Fayette Mall, Sunday, Oct. 3, 1976. The store, along with Sears, and Stewart Dry Goods, was one of the original anchor stores for the mall when it opened in 1971. In 1982 the store's parent company, Federated Department Stores Inc. announced that it had combined the operations of its Rikes and Shillito's stores, naming the stores Shillito's Rikes. In 1986 after a merger of other Federated Department Stores divisions, it became Lazarus.

Full-page advertisement in the Herald-Leader celebrating the fifth anniversary of Shillito’s department store in Fayette Mall on Oct. 3, 1976. Note: Most of the clothing in the ad was polyester. The store, along with Sears, and Stewart Dry Goods, was one of the original anchor stores for the mall when it opened in 1971. In 1982, the store’s parent company, Federated Department Stores Inc., announced that it had combined the operations of its Rikes and Shillito’s stores, naming the stores Shillito’s Rikes. In 1986, after a merger of other Federated Department Stores divisions, it became Lazarus. Click on the image for a closer look.

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