Photos from the Lexington Herald-Leader archives updated daily

Lexington Leader’s coverage of Titanic sinking, 1912

The front page of the April 16, 1912, Lexington Leader, with news about the sinking of the RMS Titanic the day before. The largest passenger liner in service at the time, she sank four days into her maiden voyage from Southampton in England to New York City. An estimated 2,224 people were on board when she struck an iceberg on the night of April 14. She sank two hours and forty minutes later, claiming more than 1,500 lives. The Lexington Leader was the afternoon newspaper, and the Lexington Herald was circulated in the morning. The two merged in 1983, creating the Lexington Herald-Leader. Click on the image for a closer look.

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University of Kentucky students square-dance, 1950

University of Kentucky students square-danced in Lexington’s Loudoun House, April 1950. They were dancing a “birdie in the cage” move. The photo ran with other images highlighting the rise in popularity of old-fashioned square dances. The popularity spread across Central Kentucky, with groups of youngsters, collegians and adults forming clubs. The return of the square dance also influenced styles of clothing. The story said clothing reminiscent of the Old South became popular with young women in high school and college, replacing the untidy garments of the war years with quaint, ruffled calico frocks with swirling skirts, basque waists and dropped shoulders. Levis, bright plaid shirts and galluses were in order for their escorts. Published April 16, 1950, in the Sunday Herald-Leader

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Family dog lying in state in custom-built casket, 1950

Wanda, a 15-year-old white Spitz, lay in state April 27, 1950, in a custom-built casket at the home of her master, Mr. and Mrs. Roland Pinkston, 828 Tremont Avenue, in the Chevy Chase neighborhood. Beside the satin-lined pink casket with Mrs. Pinkston is Dally, the household’s 11-month-old cat, which was “practically raised” by Wanda, Mrs. Pinkston said. Wanda died after a two-week illness and was buried in the backyard. The casket was made three months earlier, when the pet dog appeared to be near death. Published in the April 28, 1950, Lexington Herald. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

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Sculptor Herbert Haseltine with Man o’ War statue, 1948

Sculptor Herbert Haseltine stood beside his statue of Man o’ War at its unveiling on Oct. 16, 1948, at Samuel Riddle’s Faraway Farm, where the great red horse was buried. Haseltine returned from France for the unveiling. The sculptor began working on the statue in 1941. He spent one to two hours a day for six months with the horse and made three consecutive models, each progressively larger than the first. The 3,000-pound statue was cast in bronze in nine pieces. It was brought to Lexington from New York two weeks before the unveiling and was mounted on its pedestal under the supervision of Danny Carter, Haseltine’s assistant. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

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Houses slated for demolition on Toner Street, 1954

A proposal by a Chamber of Commerce committee in March 1954 to demolish these houses on Toner Street was made to the Board of City Commissioners as part of a project to replace substandard housing with single-family homes. The committee proposed razing more than two acres of such houses in the Toner, Kenton, Fifth and Sixth street areas. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

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Bowling Green’s Greenwood Mall, 1992

The Greenwood Mall in Bowling Green, April 9, 1992. Scottsville Road runs up the left side of the photo, intersecting with Interstate 65. The mall is the hub of a major retail strip along the road, about 4 miles southeast of downtown. Built in 1979, today it boasts 100 stores, including four anchor stores: Dillard’s, J.C. Penney, Macy’s and Sears. Macy’s is closing, but the Belk department store will take over the space. Photo by David Stephenson | Staff

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Gay Brewer Jr. and Johnny Owens Jr., 1951

Gay Brewer Jr., left, was congratulated by Johnny Owens Jr. on June 17, 1951, after Brewer defeated him in the Tournament of Champions final at Boiling Springs Country Club. It was the second straight championship for Brewer, who won the inaugural tournament in 1950. On April 6, 1967 , Brewer, who turned professional in 1956, won The Masters tournament in Augusta, Ga. He continued to play professionally until 2001. In 2006, Brewer was voted to the University of Kentucky Athletics Hall of Fame. In 2007, the golf course in Lexington where he learned to play was renamed the “Gay Brewer Jr. Course at Picadome.” He died in 2007 at his home in Lexington. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

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Start of Blue Grass Stakes, 1949

Only four horses competed in the 1949 Blue Grass Stakes on March 28 at Keeneland Race Course. Leaving the starting gate were, from left, Old Rockport, with Gordon Glisson up; Johns Joy, with Johnny Longden up; Halt, the eventual winner, with Conn McCreary in the saddle; and Wine List, with Toddy Atkinson up. Woodvale Farm’s lightly regarded Halt came from far back to nip Johns Joy at the wire to win the $20,000-added Blue Grass Stakes. Halt, trained by Woody Stephens, went on to place fifth in the Kentucky Derby the following weekend. The 93rd running of the annual stakes race now called the Toyota Blue Grass Stakes will be held Saturday afternoon at Keeneland. Herald-Leader Archive Photo

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Unforgettables jersey retirement, 1992

From left, Kentucky basketball players Sean Woods, Richie Farmer, Deron Feldhaus and John Pelphrey waved to the Rupp Arena crowd on April 7, 1992, during an awards ceremony honoring the team. The evening was capped by the surprise announcemnt that the four seniors’ jerseys would be retired. As the seniors stood at midcourt with their families, four jerseys were unveiled atop Rupp Arena’s west side. Between jerseys honoring Jack Givens and Coach Adolph Rupp hung Farmer’s No. 32, Feldhaus’ No. 12, Pelphrey’s No. 34 and Woods’ No. 11. Until the unveiling, the seniors didn’t know of the honor. The four, later dubbed “The Unforgettables,” went through tough times when UK was on probation but hung around long enough to see the program resurrected. Pelphrey, a Kentuckian like Feldhaus and Farmer, was almost at a loss for words. “It’s a big one,” he said. “Something you don’t dare dream about. I just can’t hardly believe it. It’s hard for me to describe the feeling. It’s hard to put in words.” Coach Rick Pitino jokingly recalled his first impression of the seniors. He wondered why he left the New York Knicks for UK in 1989. “One was a skinny kid with red hair (Pelphrey),” Pitino said. “One was an overweight guy who just wanted to talk about fishing (Farmer). One never looked me in the eye and just wanted to leave the meeting (Feldhaus). One was just trying to sell me a couple watches (Woods).” Kentucky began retiring ceremonial jerseys in 1989. UK Athletics Director C.M. Newton said he had decided “a long time ago” to retire the jerseys. “Many players have scored more points,” Newton told the crowd of about 10,000. “Many have won more individual honors.” Newton then turned his attention to the seniors and said, “But no one can match what you’ve done. You truly put your heart into wearing the Kentucky jersey.” Besides the jerseys, UK celebrated the official retirement of any guilt and shame associated with the NCAA sanctions of 1989. “This is the last time I’ll mention the NCAA probation,” Newton said. “It is over and it will not happen again. … Kentucky shame is gone. The new motto is Kentucky’s back.” The Cats went 29-7 that year. Their season reached a climax in the NCAA Tournament East Region finals. Only a buzzer-beater in overtime by All- American Christian Laettner of Duke kept Kentucky from the Final Four. Click here to see more images from our archives of that 1991-92 team. Photo by Frank Anderson | Staff

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Neighborhood boys prepare to play baseball, 1942

A group of unidentified boys determined which team was going to bat first during a neighborhood baseball game on March 22, 1942. The photo was part of a story about the first day of spring in the Sunday Herald-Leader.

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